Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Stress & Visitors……

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How do you find your COPD and/or Asthma behaving when things in life get you stressed?

How does your COPD and/or Asthma hold up when having a house full of family or visitors?

Recently we talked about ‘staying on routine’ and how when normal daily activities get too far out of normal that ‘Lenny’ may get a slight bit agitated and throw a flare up or SoB into the day just to get my attention.

Asking who is ‘Lenny’?  Well for me, my COPD/Asthma is like a constant companion who sometimes behaves and keeps life running somewhat smooth, while other times, ‘Lenny’, can make life like a hurricane of struggles.

The name ‘Lenny’ is because treating my COPD/Asthma like a companion seems more sensible than getting irritated and mad at it like a constant enemy, because companion’s can and will piss you off, but they also make like much better when getting along.

So back to the main question – does stress affect your COPD and/or Asthma?  For ‘Lenny’ and me the answer is most likely yes and that holds true in this current section of road in life that I am traveling due to some major social, relationship and legal issues happening within the travels of two family members – better known as adult children.

As much as I try to find ways to relax and calm down, when it comes to the kids or grandkids – the stress level can be a rough one to shut down because I care so much about their well-being and comfort in their own travels of life that I seem to try and take on the some of the stress they should be showing due to the bumps they have encountered.

Even when I may show on the outside, a calmer demeanor that expected, there will be someone close like my wife or daughter who will catch me and ask, ‘you doing okay, your breathing is not sounding good’.  That is when I must take a step back with the mind and emotions and take those deep, slow breathing exercises to let ‘Lenny’ know that together we will work at stopping any possible flare up or SoB.  Thank you to those who notice and are willing to say so, because over the years I have become so used to how I breath, that I am normally the last one to realize a major flare up or SoB is developing until it is full blown happening.

As for those family visits, and I have one happening now with an 83-year old Aunt, two darling teenage granddaughters and an 11-year old grandson with Asperger’s, I am learning that it is okay to just excuse myself at times and go to the world of my computer and reading room to take a personal break for a bit – it is what I need to do, because trust me they do not want to be around if I have a major flare up or SoB with ‘Lenny’.

I am sure that ‘Lenny’ and I will survive the stress, hustle and bustle of a long weekend of family, fireworks, visiting and fooding – and whether I really do or not, surely something will come out of it for a solid topic of ‘Lenny’ and Me for Today….

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer medical founded information.

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Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – Insight into ‘Breo Ellipta’, part 2

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It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Today we are sharing a compilation of information found in postings found on the internet regarding the COPD/Asthma medicine ‘Breo Ellipta’.

Special Note – This writer takes Breo Ellipta and found many insights to the medicine that we were not aware of when our physician/pulmonologist prescribed it for our daily routine in our own battle with COPD and/or Asthma.

So – here is part two, of a two-part series giving you an ‘Insight to ‘Breo Ellipta’.

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In part two of ‘Insight to ‘Breo Ellipta’’, we discuss possible side effects to the medicine.

‘Breo Ellipta’ is used in patients not adequately controlled on a long-term asthma medication, such as an inhaled corticosteroid, or when the severity of the disease clearly warrants initiation of treatment with both an inhaled corticosteroid and a long-acting beta-adrenoceptor agonist.

Important to remember is – if you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember or skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose.  Remember – do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

You must get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to the ‘Breo Ellipta’ with hives and/or difficult breathing, plus swelling of your face, lips, tongue or throat.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Breo Ellipta: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

You should consider calling your physician if you have any of the following possible side effects from using ‘Breo Ellipta’ would be –

  • > Wheezing, choking or other breathing problems after using the medication.
  • > Chest pain, shortness of breath, tremors or nervousness.
  • > Feeling very weak or tired, nausea and vomiting, feeling like you might pass out.
  • > Blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain or seeing halos around a light.
  • > Fever, chills, cough with yellow or green musus.
  • > Sores or white patches in the patients mouth and throat, having pain when swallowing.
  • > Low potassium such as leg cramps, constipation, irregular heartbeat, fluttering in your chest, extreme thirst, increased urination, numbness or tingling, muscle weakness or limp feeling.
  • > High blood sugar such as increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision and weight loss.
  • > A headache, runny or stuffy nose or possible sore throat.
  • > Loss of voice.
  • > Pounding in the ears or inability to sleep.
  • > Unusual weight gain or loss, or loss of appetite.

Know that this is not a complete list of side effects and that others may occur, but if you develop any of these you should call your physician and discuss the possible side effects immediately.

Also note that many drugs can interact with the fluticasone and vilanterol that makes up ‘Breo Ellipta’.  We will list a few possible interactions, but you should be honest with your physician about all your medications, as well as all vitamins, over-the-counter meds or herbal supplements, and discuss if any should be stopped during treatments with ‘Breo Ellipta’.

  • > Antifungal medicine such as ketoconazole.
  • > ritonavir or other HIV/AIDS medicines.
  • > Heart medication such as atenolol, carvedilol, metoprolol, nebivolol among others.

Whatever you do, be sure and watch, listen and see if you may be having any possible side effects and let your physician know immediately.

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‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Living-4-Today – – Importance of Sharing

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Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your daily battles with a chronic illness and/or disability as I have within mine….

The Word – “And our hope for you is firm, because we know that just as you share in our sufferings, so also you share in our comfort.”  (2 Corinthians 1:7, NIV)

The Thought – Many times when we are traveling along the road of chronic illness, we find ourselves just wanting to be alone, whether it be during a travel of suffering or a travel of good times, we just feel like being along to ourselves.

Yes, there are many moments in which that is a good thing.  But we must also recognize the importance of sharing both the good times and those times of suffering or frustration, because without sharing those who surround us in our travels of life will not understand just what the chronic illness is doing to ourselves and the life we work hard at living.

When we get face-to-face with the ‘Great Spirits’ we find sharing is an important tool to helping find and keep the four fundamentals of life and happiness within our grasp of everyday living – those being hope, faith, love and grace.  Without sharing several of those four fundamentals can and will be difficult to keep a hold of.

And if asked, yes – sharing can and will open yourself up to pain and ridicule from and by those who still do not or will not work on understanding your chronic illness and all that it entails.  But without sharing we also do not allow those same folks to have the opportunity to either understand and work with you as you travel the road of life that has the companionship of chronic illness.

So even in those days that our mind and even our heart may be saying, ‘I want to be alone’, we must remember that many times those days are the most important ones to share with others as those are the days which the ‘Great Spirits’ may open up the avenue of compassion from others to fully understand what we deal with in our travels with the companionship of chronic illness.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we look to you, the ‘Great Spirits’, for guidance and wisdom – may we always remember to first give thanks for all that surrounds us in our travels of life and that is thanks for not just the good and wonderful, but also for the bad and painful, for we learn from them all.  ‘Great Spirits’ we seek guidance and wisdom to always be willing to share our travels with others, with the hopes that by sharing they may better understand our travel companion we call chronic illness.  We also continue to seek and understand the values of the four fundamentals of life and happiness – those being hope, faith, love and grace, with the realization of just what each bring to our life and travels.  So we step forward into our day with continued thanks and appreciation for your guidance, wisdom and understanding.

With that we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Pneumothorax’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word ‘Pneumothorax’.

‘Pneumothorax’ is the medical terminology for a ‘collapsed lung’ or what happens when air leaks from inside the lung and gathers in the space between the lung and the chest wall.  The leaked air will push against the outside of the lung causing it to eventually collapse.

Most likely the symptoms of ‘pneumothorax’ will include both sudden chest pain and shortness of breath.  While these symptoms are already common in those battling COPD/Asthma the causes for an actual collapsed lung can come from chest injuries (such as blunt trauma) and the two that COPD/Asthma patients must watch closely – underlying lung disease (which we have) and mechanical ventilation (may cause an imbalance of air pressure within the chest/lung).

The Mayo Clinic researchers list risk factors for developing a bout of ‘Pneumothorax’ with those being Sex (generally men are more likely to get a bout), Smoking, Age, Genetics, history of having ‘pneumothorax’, previous Lung Disease diagnosis and whether you may be or have been on a type of mechanical ventilation.

Treating a bout with ‘Pneumothorax’ will depend on the severity of the episode but will include either one of and/or combination of Observations, a Needle or Chest Tube Insertion and possible Surgery.

While battling COPD/Asthma the idea of having a bout with ‘Pneumothorax’ or ‘Collapsed Lung’ can be very scary which is why it is so important that we stay attuned to what our body is telling us each-and-every day.

With all that, we ask you the readers if you or someone you know have ever had a problem with ‘Pneumothorax’ and if so, how quickly did you get it solved?  As always, we look forward to hearing your input – thanx.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – ‘Nutrition’, Part 8 is ‘Food Safety’

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When I began my travels and battles with COPD/Asthma I knew that it was important to learn what and when I could to better understand as much about COPD and Asthma so I would always be up to date as to what I was up against.

I also felt that as a member of the COPD/Asthma nation, it was important to continually share information that may possible help even one other person in their own battles with COPD/Asthma.

With that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help both inform and refresh the knowledge of all that goes with battling COPD and/or Asthma.

Today we discuss or refresh your knowledge about ‘Food Safety’ with the eighth of a ten-part series on ‘Nutrition’.

With the outdoor grilling season going full speed ahead, it is a great time to have a discussion and/or reminder on some very key recommendations for ‘food safety’, especially since having a chronic illness leaves us very much open as an easy target for any airborne or foodborne problems.

}} ALWAYS keep clean hands, food preparation surfaces and all fruits/vegetables.

}} You should NEVER wash or rinse meat and poultry.

}} When shopping, preparing or storing any foods – ALWAYS separate raw, cooked and ready-to-eat food items.

}} ALWAYS cook foods to a safe temperature – this is how you kill any microorganisms.

}} ALWAYS chill foods that are perishable properly.

}} ALWAYS defrost food properly – do not take shortcuts.

}} AVOID unpasteurized milk or any product made from unpasteurized milk.

}} AVOID raw or partially cooked eggs and/or foods containing them.

}} AVOID raw or undercooked meat and poultry.

}} AVOID unpasteurized juices.

‘COPD Travels’ will continue talking nutrition beyond the diet/meal itself with upcoming discussions on areas involving food safety and physical conditioning.

REFLECTION QUESTION – Since being diagnosed with a chronic illness, have you changed your routine when cooking either indoors or outdoors?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)

‘Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Keeping a Routine……

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Is your COPD/Asthma a friend, companion or enemy?

For me, my COPD/Asthma is like a constant companion who sometimes makes life run smooth while other times making life a hurricane of struggles.

As a companion, I decided to name my COPD/Asthma – which is why this is titled ‘Lenny’ and Me, because ‘Lenny’ makes it more like I am talking about a companion than just an illness.  Treating ‘Lenny’ more as a companion, come good days and bad, makes it much easier to deal with than fighting it like an enemy.

So ‘‘Lenny’ and Me for Today’ is an occasional write about the adventures and battles of living with the chronic illness we call COPD/Asthma.

Let’s see where ‘Lenny’ and Me have been most recently – Staying on Routine…..

Most of us have a routine, whether it be at work or home, as it seems that life expects us to stick to certain order of things to get through our work or day – and that is what we call a routine.  Here is a glance at just a few, near must dos within my daily routine.

While my whole day is not exactly a fine-tuned machine, I do know that my day kicks off much better when I take care of them lungs, while doing what is needed to keep ‘Lenny’ happy and in check to start the day.

After taking my ‘nose pillows’ off and shutting down the c-pap machine, I grab a bottle of water and drink it at a steady pace – one to relieve a case of dry mouth from my c-pap use, while also filling me up so I may not be so hungry for breakfast that I will over eat.

From there I make a run on the nebulizer to help wake the lungs up from a deep sleep and prepare them for the day ahead.  It seems that most mornings, ‘Lenny’ is made happy, happy with a run of eight-to-ten minutes on that nebulizer followed up with a deep (or as deep as that morning would allow) inhale of my ‘Breo Ellipta’.  While doing my nebulizer I also work at waking up the old body up as well by doing some sitting Tai Chi moves with my upper body.

At this point we have a routine that many days seems like no routine as the only items for sure on the list are breakfast, lunch, supper and maybe a nap somewhere in between.

Being in the food business for over 20+ years, I was used to a routine that was based on getting things done in order to be ready for that first and last customer of the day.

Being put out to retirement early by my companion ‘Lenny’, I find keeping a solid routine somewhat difficult and most likely impossible on those days when ‘Lenny’ finds one of those triggers that tells him to fire up the flare ups and SoB’s.

To help keep somewhat of a routine, I do work hard at spending most of the mornings working on my writings for the local weekly newspaper, my blogs dealing with chronic illness, food and life itself.  Around that I schedule out, though seldom accomplish, times for a bit of my photography and art.

Every night before bed I make out a list of what I want to accomplish the next day while knowing full well that most days I put much more on the list than will and does actually gets done.

What I do know is that when my early morning routine and that ‘loose’ version of a daily routine gets tossed around and rearranged – my system gets irritated and frustrated, which in turns makes me seem grumpy and impatient, while many times raising my stress to a point that ‘Lenny’ says – enough is enough – and fires up a flare up, sometimes just to get my attention.

The message today from ‘Lenny’ and Me for Today is to never give up and always have a routine in the works and at least planned – because contrary to what many may think, if the body is given a routine the odds seem to slim down on whether you deliver moments of regrets, frustration and irritation within your walk of life.

If I make out my schedule for that tomorrow I hope to get, I know that my day is heading in the correct direction while securing a much lesser percentage of failure – failure at giving ‘Lenny’ any opportunity to crash the day by throwing out a flare up or SoB.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer medical founded information.

Living-4-Today – – Unhindered Time

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Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your daily battles with a chronic illness and/or disability as I have within mine….

The Word – “Time passes unhindered. When we make mistakes, we cannot turn the clock back and try again. All we can do is use the present well.” – Dalai Lama

The Thought – One thing we all realize, especially as we begin to fly through those later years, is that time does not stop for anyone or anything.  Time just seems to always be in a mode of cruise and keeps rolling forward unhindered no matter what I do or don’t do.

As with many of us that are fighting a chronic illness, we have had times where we would look back and make the effort to dissect those things that we determined as being mistakes in choices along our path of life and in some of those instances have even tried to turn the clock back and change the outcome.  Guess what – it doesn’t work that way.

Time marches on unhindered, unwilling to give us those chances to fix the wrongs, change the mistakes or undo the harm or outcome of bad choices, and this is especially true with health issues because when you get to that point where your health becomes a chronic problem there is no turning back the clock of time.

The best we can do is realize what those past mistakes make great learning lessons and those lessons should be used to make our present-day situations more livable.

Those who spend time each day with the ‘Great Spirits’ in quiet meditation and/or prayer, most likely have that unique relationship with the ‘Great Spirits’ that give us the opportunity to unload our past mistakes, sometimes many times over, while looking for the guidance to make better use of our today.

When we realize that time moves forward unhindered from anything we may do, we learn to work with our time to make the best of what is available and with that perception we can then work at the four fundamentals of life and happiness – finding hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we step into silent time of meditation and/or prayer, we call upon the ‘Great Spirits’ with much gratitude for all that surrounds us in our current moments of walks in life itself and say thank you for being so forgiving in all our mistakes made in the walk up to this moment in time.  We ask the ‘Great Spirits’ to give us the guidance and wisdom to make the four fundamentals of life and happiness – hope, faith, love and grace – the focus of our battles not only with our chronic illness, but also the battle we face of time moving forward so fast and so unhindered.

With that we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)