Living-4-Today – – Strong Like a Tree

Standard

Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your daily battles with a chronic illness and/or disability as I have within mine….

The Word – “He will be like a tree planted by the water that sends out its roots by the stream.  It does not fear when heat comes; its leaves are always green.  It has no worries in a year of drought and never fails to bear fruit.”  (The Bible: Jeremiah 17:8, NIV)

The Thought – As hard as it may seem, especially when fighting battles like COPD and/or severe Asthma, the goal we must strive for is to be solid and strong like a large tree.

When you think about a solid, tall majestic tree in your yard or neighborhood, do you not think of the protection it supplies with shade in the hot of the summer and the number of branches it uses to provide and protect those many squirrels, birds and such from weather and life.

We too need to become like a solid, majestic tree that keeps its roots planted deep and steady to the foundation of earth.  Hold steady in your pursuit to find the solutions needed to help overcome any heavy winds of issues that may try and knock you over or completely down.

We too need to become protectors, using our branches of love, hope, faith and grace to protect those around us in our travels of life, showing them the strength we have in working to overcome and endure the battles we face in our own individual travels with COPD and/or severe asthma.

While being strong can on many days seem like an impossible task – it is our own showing of strength and endurance with our own battles that can shine onto others and give them the hope and faith to overcome theirs.

How do we stay strong and majestic like a tree, giving security to those around us – we do it by spending time with the ‘Great Spirits’ in quiet times of listening and speaking, thanking the ‘Great Spirits’ for all they have given us, while listening in silence to the wisdom and guidance bestowed on us to reach the strength found in the four fundamentals of life and happiness, those being of hope, faith, love and grace.

Step up, be strong and envelope others within your world like a large branch offering protection from the elements of life by being secure with your own life, holding your feet firmly to the ground like the strong roots of an Oak tree and protect those around you with the elements of hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we enter our quiet time of meditation, our time to spend conversing and listening to you, ‘Great Spirits’, we say thank you for all that you surround us with in our daily travels of life – and yes we even thank you for those battles we fight as we know they will make us stronger.  Today we seek continued guidance in the four fundamentals of life and happiness – hope, faith, love and grace, so that we may be stronger and more enduring for those around us who also may be suffering with us during those battles.  We look forward to those days when we can share, prepare and protect all those within our world, just as you, ‘Great Spirits’ protect us.

With that we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – Keeping Intimacy and More with COPD, Set 2

Standard

It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Here we share part two of a two-part set, offering a discussion on the ‘Factors Associated with COPD Life Expectancy’.

Special Note – This writer is married and was diagnosed with late Stage 3 COPD three months after surviving a major heart attack.  Those two medical incidents have made our marriage stronger in most all areas and more challenging in several others, with intimacy and sex being one of them.  How we are doing is personal, but this write has some solid information for those who face the same challengers and fears.

So – here is the second of three-sets discussing ‘9 Points for Better Sex and Intimacy when you have COPD’.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

(This article was found within the expanded world of the internet and was written seven years past with a review by Brunilda Nazario, MD. – we repeated the opening comments before getting into tips three, four, five and six.)

‘9 Tips for Better Sex and Intimacy when You have COPD’

By Katherine Kam

If you or your partner are living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, you may be wondering what effect COPD will have on your sexuality. Will sex be possible? Will it be safe? Satisfying?

COPD symptoms like coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath will almost certainly change the way you and your partner express yourselves sexually. But that doesn’t mean you must bid adieu to sex or other forms of physical intimacy.

Of course, good sex isn’t automatic when COPD is in the picture. To get things right, it’s essential to talk about sex with your partner (or, if you’re single, with prospective partners).

“I tell my patients to approach the subject openly and directly,” says Robert A. (Sandy) Sandhaus, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at National Jewish Health hospital in Denver and a member of the medical and scientific advisory board of the COPD Foundation. “Starting the conversation is often the most important step — and the biggest hump to get over.”

If you’re uncomfortable with a face-to-face talk, consider communicating with your partner or prospective partner via telephone or letter. Make it clear what you want and expect from sex, ask what your partner wants and expects, and do your best to agree upon the steps you’ll take together to overcome any sexual problems that arise.

Now for Tips 3, 4, 5 and 6 – –

  1. Rid Your Bedroom of Irritants

COPD symptoms can be aggravated by dust, pet dander, smoke, fragrances, etc. Do all you can to rid the bedroom of these lung irritants.

Dust, vacuum, and wash the sheets regularly. Consider using a HEPA air filter. And watch out for smelly cleaning products — especially chlorine bleach or ammonia — as their odors can trigger symptoms.

If scented deodorant or shampoo poses a problem, consider switching to unscented varieties. If excessive mucus secretion causes trouble, keep a box of tissues at the bedside. Nasal irrigation before sex can help, as can using a mucus-loosening vibrating vest.

  1. Get a Fan

Recent research has shown that a cool breeze on the face can help ease the distressing shortness of breath that people with COPD often experience during sex. The flow of air can come from an open window or a fan.

“A simple electric fan can really be helpful,” says Goodell. Similarly, keeping the bedroom cool helps keep a buildup of body heat from adding to breathlessness.

  1. Take Your Medication Before Sex

The short-acting bronchodilators that many people with COPD use before exercise also help prevent coughing and breathlessness during sexual activity. Doctors recommend taking an anticipatory dose about 15 minutes before sex.

“For most people, two puffs or so is enough,” says Goodell. “It’s really a matter of patients testing the waters and knowing what their responses are.”

To get rid of the unpleasant aftertaste that might distract you or offend your partner, rinse out your mouth with an alcohol-containing mouthwash after using the inhaler.

  1. Consider Using Supplemental Oxygen

If you or your partner finds supplemental oxygen helpful at other times, ask the doctor about using it during sexual activity.

“If you need to wear oxygen while walking, you’ll probably need to use it during sex,” says Sandhaus. The doctor might suggest increasing the flow of oxygen during sexual activity — to accommodate the body’s increased need for oxygen during exertion.

If the partner with COPD doesn’t use supplemental oxygen but wonders if it would help during sex, you can find out with the help of an oximeter, a simple electronic device that the partner with COPD wears on his/her fingertip. If the readout indicates that the oxygen saturation falls below 88%, using supplemental oxygen during sex could prove helpful.

Ask your doctor. He or she might be able to loan you an oximeter. If not, you can buy one for under $50.

(In set three, the final set, we will read about not being afraid to experiment, taking a break and remembering your goal.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – ‘Bringing Stability to a COPD/Asthma Life’, Set 5 = Socializing

Standard

I am one of those that has been given the honor of traveling life with the companionship of COPD and severe Asthma.

While the honor is many times pushed by the frustration and battle with those companions, I have over time come to grips that it is what it is and I must make the best of it.

I knew I must learn more about this companion the medical folks call COPD and severe Asthma, so I have read about, ask questions about it and spent time nearly every day scouring the internet for information, articles and more.

I also knew it is good to share, so as a writer I decided what better way to share what I am learning and finding than through informational, inspirational and personal writings about my travels with COPD and severe Asthma.

This is part of an on-going series we call ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma and today we give you set five of a six-part set called ‘Bringing Stability to a COPD/Asthma Life’.

BRINGING STABILITY TO A LIFE WITH COPD/ASTHMA – –

One of the most important things a person can do when doing battle with COPD and/or Asthma is to bring a sense of stability within those daily battles and travels.

There are six simple areas which seem to stand out as important for building stability within a life with COPD and/or Asthma and they are – exercising, avoiding sickness, sleep and rest, knowing yourself, social contact, and nutrition.

Stability, Set – 5 – – Keep Social Contact

Even without the constant daily battles of an illness, when a person lacks social contact with others it can lead to a feeling of isolation and many times, a period of depression.

When that begins to happen on top of having to fight that daily battle with something such as COPD and/or severe Asthma, then that feeling of being isolated can and will be a huge hindrance in keeping yourself on top of the illness which you may be battling.

Just because you may be fighting an illness and/or disease, unless you are feeling extremely sick – you should always take advantage of any opportunity to get out, whether it is a trip to the store, to church or even to the home of a friend or maybe a family member.

Getting out keeps you in touch with that feeling of being relevant to the rest of the world as it passes through the days.

Getting out should also help keep you feeling more upbeat and in the frame of mind that is saying ‘this disease will not rob me of socializing’ and that my friend, is a lot of the battle you have every day – feeling like you are still part of the world around you.

The idea of joining a support group for those with COPD and/or any major illness can be an outstanding idea because it gives a person an opportunity to share, learn, question, help and support with others that are dealing with many of the same issues you are, only in their own travels of life with an illness and/or disease.

One should find a support group, and if it appears you do not have one in your area then maybe one should step out of their comfort zone and look at starting one of their own – because the positive rewards of participating within a support group far outweigh any possible negative connotations.

Get out of your comfort zone and inquire or work with your physician, local respiratory therapist and pulmonologist to see if they have any suggestions or maybe a list of prospective members.

Whatever you decide to do, do not let yourself get that feeling of isolation – step out and step into the world of socializing and begin to reap the benefits and life stability of doing so.

REFLECTION QUESTION – – What do you do to guarantee you do not become isolated, being alone?  Do you have a support group to work and socialize with?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Transtracheal Systems’

Standard

When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Transtracheal Systems’.

What is ‘Transtracheal Systems’?

While those folks battling COPD and/or severe Asthma, having supplemental oxygen is normally provided through a nasal cannula, using a ‘Transtracheal System’ a person would have medical experts inject a catheter style tube through a small hole made in the trachea (windpipe) through which supplemental oxygen can travel to the lungs.

People must understand that this is not the same as a tracheotomy, they are entirely different.

A ‘Transtracheal System’ has been in use for long-term oxygen therapy and treating chronic hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) for getting close to 30 years.  More than 25,000 people have used this system during this period, with the majority of whom have experienced a significant improvement in the quality of their lives.

‘Transtracheal Systems’ are more than just a device to supply oxygen, it is a program of care.

When is a ‘Transtracheal System’ to be considered?  It can be considered for anyone on long-term oxygen therapy as a desired improvement in oxygen-flow requirements, if the person is willing to participate in and will care for the catheter tubing.  As with any treatment, a person fighting COPD and/or severe Asthma should always talk in depth with the physician and pulmonologist about whether a ‘Transtracheal System’ should be an option.

Those who may be recommended would be those who meet current guidelines for long-term oxygen therapy, are currently mobile outside of the home at least part of the time, are motivated to remain active and will comply with oxygen therapy and the proper care and cleaning of the catheter system.

A ‘Transtracheal System’ could also be considered for those who require higher oxygen flows and want to remain active by using lower flows of oxygen, and don’t want to wear the nasal cannula due to irritation of the nose or nosebleeds.

Among the benefits found with a ‘Transtracheal System’ could be an improvement quality of life for anyone suffering from COPD, advanced fibrotic lung disease such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease and bronchiectasis.

Other benefits will include reducing the amount of oxygen flow needed to achieve healthy oxygen levels, improve activity levels and mobility, improve exercise capacity, improve the response to oxygen treatment, reduce the length of hospitalization, reduce shortness of breath (dyspnea) while improving the persons physical, social and mental functions.

Like with any therapy, a ‘Transtracheal System’ will include some possible side effects that a person would always need to be watching for.  These possible side effects could include increased infections, tube slipping, injury to the windpipe and mucus balls blocking the tube.

With that, we like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS and today we ask, “If your battle with COPD and/or severe Asthma was deemed severe enough to possible consider the ‘Transtracheal System’ as a solution to your breathing and oxygen issues – would you consider doing it?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

 

 

‘Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Fatigued and Tired…..

Standard

Over the past several years I have found, that with my COPD and severe Asthma I have to really pace myself during the heat of the days in summer and up until this year thought I was doing a fairly good job of it.

But since ‘Lenny’ tossed flare up at me some ten days ago, I have found myself running life as if I was running a constant marathon going uphill at a 45-degree angle.  In other words, I seem to be constantly fighting fatigue and even falling asleep without realizing it while writing at the laptop or watching a bit of television.

Now some of this I am pretty sure I can trace back to the weather as here in my neighborhood (very central, near dead center of the United States) we have been having un-normally hot weather where the temps have hovered around 100-105 degrees off and on now for almost two weeks.  In fact, I believe I heard a city just north of where I live hit the 100-plus mark 12 days in a row.

When you combine that with humidity that stays above 30-40% for large chunks of the day, then most who have lung issues will know, that yes – the weather could be a contributing factor.

Good example would be last weekend when I, for a write I was working on for a local newspaper, went to an event to get some quotes and pics.  But due to the high humidity and heat, as I walked from my vehicle to where the folks were that I was needing to meet – ‘Lenny’ gave me a major commotion in response to having to breath in that thick, humid air.

After having to stop more than twice while attempting to walk barely a block, my lungs, my body and my mind were all telling me that this just is not going to happen.  With that I returned to my vehicle and returned home, and when I walked in the door and grabbed my oximeter – oh my goodness, no wonder I was feeling like c#%p as my oxygen level was wavering between 87-88 and mostly likely had been like that for at least 15 minutes.

As we (those who fight COPD and severe Asthma) know, when you get hit with even a short stretch of SoB it can kick you like you just ran an ultra-marathon and you will feel so tired and worn out for much of the remainder of your day – and that is exactly what happened, I felt like I had to rest the rest of the day because the short period of fighting for oxygen just kicked my tale.

So here I am ten-days down the road from my last post and yet thanks to the heat and humidity called weather, plus a large family get together on Saturday – I am feeling exhausted and it seems like my shoulders, elbows, neck and chest are just plain worn out, stiff with exhaustion.

Where do I go from here?  I try to get a better run of sleep at night, take a short nap here and there if necessary, make some adjustments to my diet and keep rolling forward as my life does not stop and I must get things done.  But I move forward with not only my mind on a swivel looking for triggers, but with my mind taking notes on how the body is feeling and functioning with preset preparations on things to do before that exhaustion and tiredness kills my whole day ahead.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

Want to know who ‘Lenny’ is?  ‘Lenny’ is the name I gave my constant companion called COPD/Asthma.  I have found that referring and dealing with my chronic illness as a companion I am less apt to get angry with it, but instead more likely to work with it like you would in a strong relationship.  Besides treating anything with TLC is much better than hammering away at it as if it was an enemy.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer medical founded information.

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – Keeping Intimacy and More with COPD, Set 1

Standard

It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Here we share part two of a two-part set, offering a discussion on the ‘Factors Associated with COPD Life Expectancy’.

Special Note – This writer is married and was diagnosed with late Stage 3 COPD three months after surviving a major heart attack.  Those two medical incidents have made our marriage stronger in most all areas and more challenging in several others, with intimacy and sex being one of them.  How we are doing is personal, but this write has some solid information for those who face the same challengers and fears.

So – here is the first, of three-sets discussing ‘9 Points for Better Sex and Intimacy when you have COPD’.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

(This article was found within the expanded world of the internet and was written seven years past with a review by Brunilda Nazario, MD.)

‘9 Tips for Better Sex and Intimacy when You have COPD’

By Katherine Kam

If you or your partner are living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, you may be wondering what effect COPD will have on your sexuality. Will sex be possible? Will it be safe? Satisfying?

COPD symptoms like coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath will almost certainly change the way you and your partner express yourselves sexually. But that doesn’t mean you must bid adieu to sex or other forms of physical intimacy.

Of course, good sex isn’t automatic when COPD is in the picture. To get things right, it’s essential to talk about sex with your partner (or, if you’re single, with prospective partners).

“I tell my patients to approach the subject openly and directly,” says Robert A. (Sandy) Sandhaus, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at National Jewish Health hospital in Denver and a member of the medical and scientific advisory board of the COPD Foundation. “Starting the conversation is often the most important step — and the biggest hump to get over.”

If you’re uncomfortable with a face-to-face talk, consider communicating with your partner or prospective partner via telephone or letter. Make it clear what you want and expect from sex, ask what your partner wants and expects, and do your best to agree upon the steps you’ll take together to overcome any sexual problems that arise.

Here are nine helpful strategies for sex and intimacy when you have COPD:

  1. Get Fit

Not sure you or your partner has the stamina for sex? Ramping up your fitness regimens might prove helpful.

Maybe it would help to initiate a program of walking or gentle exercises. Perhaps it would make sense to join — or rejoin — a local hospital’s pulmonary rehabilitation program.

“Rehab programs aren’t limited to people who are newly diagnosed with COPD,” says COPD specialist Teresa T. Goodell, PhD, RN, assistant professor of nursing at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland. “They‘re for anyone who needs to build exercise tolerance. They provide a safe place to exercise and help show people with COPD that it’s safe to exercise.”

Rehab programs typically meet once or twice a week for up to six months.

  1. Pick the Right Time

Good sex needn’t require expending lots of energy. “The energy requirements for sex aren’t that different from the energy requirements for doing other things,” says Barbara Rogers, president and CEO of the Emphysema/COPD Association in New York City.

“If you can walk up two flights of stairs or walk briskly, you can probably handle sex,” she says.

Still, people with COPD sometimes become fatigued during sex. To make sure you or your partner doesn’t poop out, schedule sexual encounters for a time of day when the partner with COPD feels most energetic.

True, scheduling sex means forgoing the spontaneity that often makes for good sex. But requesting sex in the form of a flirtatious note can add a dash of excitement. Or you and your partner might wink at one another (or come up with another sign) to indicate that you’d like to “turn in early.” Make scheduling sex an erotic game, not a chore.

(In set two we will read about ridding your bedroom of irritants, getting a fan, taking your medications and consider supplemental oxygen.)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Somnolence’

Standard

When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Somnolence’.

What is Somnolence?

Somnolence is referenced as “excessive drowsiness or sleepiness”.  When you have COPD, having a problem with ‘somnolence’ could be a sign of dangerously high levels of carbon dioxide in your blood and should be checked by a physician and/or pulmonologist immediately.

While ‘somnolence’ by itself is most often referred to as a symptom rather than a disorder, the concept of ‘somnolence’ recurring at times under certain reasons constitutes various disorders such as shift work sleep disorder and excessive daytime sleepiness.

Having a problem with ‘somnolence’ or sleepiness can cause a dangerous situation when an individual is attempting to perform tasks that may require constant concentration such as running machinery or driving a vehicle.

One thing to remember is that ‘somnolence’ is a state of having a strong desire for sleep or wanting to sleep for long periods, and can be a sign of several medical disorders or problems – including an effect from having COPD and/or severe Asthma.

The symptoms that relate to having ‘somnolence’ can be common in those with a moderate and/or severe stage of COPD and/or Asthma.

When a person with COPD and/or severe Asthma is having difficulties with drowsiness and/or sleepiness, they should check with their physician and/or pulmonologist about what may be causing the difficulty, as it could be more than just a problem with levels of carbon dioxide, it could be other parts of the body reacting to having trouble with keeping your oxygen levels up.

With that we like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS – today we ask, “Do you find yourself having problems with feeling drowsy during the day or in particular after you have had even a small flare up or bout with SoB?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)