Reflections of COPD/Asthma – ‘Bringing Stability to a COPD/Asthma Life’, Part 1 = Exercise

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I am one of those that has been given the honor of traveling life with the companionship of COPD and severe Asthma.

While the honor is many times pushed by the frustration and battle with those companions, I have over time come to grips that it is what it is and I must make the best of it.

I knew I must learn more about this companion the medical folks call COPD and severe Asthma, so I have read about, ask questions about it and spent time nearly every day scouring the internet for information, articles and more.

I also knew it is good to share, so as a writer I decided what better way to share what I am learning and finding than through informational, inspirational and personal writings about my travels with COPD and severe Asthma.

This is part of an on-going series we call ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma and today we begin a six-part series called ‘Bringing Stability to a COPD/Asthma Life’.

Stability in Life when a person is battling a constant companion like COPD and/or Asthma can be very challenging as both can, at the snap of the fingers, flare up and cause a problem or disaster to the day or week.

In scouring various areas of information, ‘Bringing Stability’ to a life with COPD and/or Asthma can be done and more importantly must be, at the absolute minimum, worked on with a regular routine and awareness.

We begin our six-part series on ‘Bringing Stability to a life with COPD/Asthma’ by talking about ‘consistency in exercising’.

BRINGING STABILITY TO A LIFE WITH COPD/ASTHMA – –

One of the most important things a person can do when doing battle with COPD and/or Asthma is to bring a sense of stability within those daily battles and travels.

There are six simple areas which seem to stand out as important for building stability within a life with COPD and/or Asthma and they are – exercising, avoiding sickness, sleep and rest, knowing yourself, social contact, and nutrition.

Part 1 – – Exercising!

Exercising to many is not much fun to begin with and when you have health issues like COPD and/or Asthma, it can become even more difficult to get it done and get done regularly.

But those with COPD and/or Asthma, it is extremely important to exercise to keep the full body working in a healthy and proper way.

Plus, for those who also may have heart issues along with their COPD and/or Asthma (and many do), the word exercise becomes a bit more challenging on other levels.

Daily walking, riding a bike (either outdoors or an exercise bike indoors), getting on a treadmill or even doing something like Tai Chi, Tae Bo or shadow boxing, and for some light weightlifting is of daily importance.

Doing it and doing it consistently is possible the most important, because doing it consistently is telling your whole body that they are part of the recovery, healing or surviving process as you battle that lung deficiency called COPD and/or Asthma.

This writer knows how difficult it is and on top of that, this writer is not big on lots of exercising – but I can tell you without any doubt that my body, my world knows when I am not exercising because it not only affects my companion of COPD and/or Asthma, but it affects one’s whole life.

Some days will go better than others, but all should aim for five days a week to exercise and one should always go for a goal, for instance a minimum of 15 minutes per time when it is a not so good day, with a minimum of 30 minutes on those days when all is working well.  When you get better at that exercising routine, then some can and should try it twice a day at least three of those days each week.

Always remember to give yourself at least two days rest each week to let the body a chance to recuperate and contemplate the new life it is adventuring in called exercising.

Will you always like doing this, heck no – but you will find the realization that when you do exercise regularly, your breathing and heart rates will stabilize and your time frame of bouncing back from any flare ups or SoB’s (short of breath) will decrease.  Oh, did we also mention that regular exercising will most likely result in a much better and consistent attitude and behavior, trust in that those around you will take notice.

So, for this part one – remember that even when you may not want to, the stability or consistency of exercising of some sort will always prove better than not doing it at all and in doing so, your stability in the companion of COPD and/or Asthma will increase as well.

RELECTION QUESTION – – What do you find is the best way to exercise and how do you find doing it consistently is building more stability in your own battles with COPD and/or Asthma?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.c

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