Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Beta-2 Agonist’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Beta-2 Agonist’.

What is ‘Beta-2 Agonist’?

A very basic definition would be – a medication that relaxes and widens the airways, making breathing easier.

Beta-2 agonists are a type of bronchodilator, which means they were developed to help make breathing easier and are normally available in metered-dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, a nebulizer, pill, injected, and in syrup forms.

Many ‘beta-2 agonists may be available in multiple forms and it will be your physician or pulmonologist who will help you decide which form works best for you and the level of your COPD and/or severe Asthma.

There will be two types of ‘beta-2 agonists’ to work with – one being short-acting and one being long-acting.

The short-acting type of ‘beta-2 agonists’ relieves symptoms and the long-acting form will help prevent further breathing problems.

Short-acting ‘beta-2 agonists’ will commonly be used for treating stable COPD with a patient whose symptoms come and go, intermittent symptoms.  The long-acting ‘beta-2 agonists’ are more effective and convenient for preventing and treating COPD in a person whose symptoms do not go away, persistent symptoms.

According to several medical reports, ‘beta-2 agonists’ are effective in treating symptoms of COPD and improving lung functions as measured by spirometry tests.  Reports also claim ‘beta-2 agonists’ can reduce the number of COPD exacerbations.

While all medicines have side effects, the most common side effects found from using ‘beta-2 agonists’ are headaches, anxiety, nausea, muscle tremors, nervousness and a possible increased or irregular heartbeat (palpitations).

According to reports, a couple of things can be pointed out about the possible side effects – one, they are more likely to occur when you take the medicine as a pill or injection, and two, side effects may appear to go away after you take the ‘beta-2 agonists’ for a while.

You should always remember to discuss with your pharmacist about the possible side effects of each medicine you take, and be sure to read any materials that come with the medicines you are prescribed.

With that, we always like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS, and today we ask, “Do you take any ‘beta-2 agonists’ as part of your routine of efforts to control the progress and affects from your battle with COPD and/or severe Asthma?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

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Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – Medicare Answers

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It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Here we share a write we found on copdfoundation.org regarding ‘Medicare Answers’ and how they are now readily available to those within the COPD community.

Special Note – When this writer was diagnosed with late Stage III COPD shortly after suffering a massive heart attack, it was an eye opener, especially after having had trouble keeping a consistent job record for several years due to health issues.  Somehow, someway, we seemed to gotten lucky in that we (with the help of our physician, pulmonologist and cardiologist) were able to jump onto early social security and Medicare.

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(This write was found on copdfoundation.org)

Medicare Answers Now Readily Available to the COPD Community

By Joe Baker, President, Medicare Rights Center

Understanding everything about Medicare, from when you should enroll to what Medicare covers – and doesn’t, to what you will pay and how to lower your costs, just became a whole lot easier for people with COPD and their families, caregivers, and health professionals.

The COPD Foundation is pleased to be working with the Medicare Rights Center, the largest and most reliable independent source of Medicare Information and assistance in the United States, to promote its newest tool, Medicare Interactive.

Judy Medicare Interactive is a free online resource packed with hundreds of answers to Medicare questions to help you navigate the complexities of Medicare coverage. The site’s new design and features ensure that its users can quickly find the Medicare answers they need through smart links to relevant Medicare Interactive pages and case examples, a roll-over glossary, and other helpful resources.

You can create a free profile to bookmark your favorite pages, manage Medicare Right’s newsletter subscriptions, access free exclusive links/downloads, and receive notices about key Medicare dates. As an initial thank you for registering, you will receive a welcome e-packet from the Medicare Rights Center, complete with the exclusive New to Medicare Guide.

To find answers to your Medicare questions, Medicare Interactive hosts an array of topics such as Introduction to Medicare, Medicare Covered Services, Filling Gaps in Medicare, and Programs for People with Low Incomes. Or, simply type in your question in the site’s Search bar.

Medicare Interactive explains, for example, the rules on how Medicare pays for oxygen equipment and supplies, repairs, and maintenance. You will also find information on the competitive bidding demonstration program for “durable medical equipment,” like oxygen, and how this program may – or may not – affect you. Medicare Interactive also offers help on how to keep costs down if you are not affected by the demonstration, or, need nebulizer equipment and supplies, which are excluded from the competitive bidding program.

If you have been denied Medicare coverage for a health service or item and want the coverage decision to be reconsidered, Medicare Interactive provides information on how to appeal. Whether you have Original Medicare, are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, or have been denied a prescription drug through Medicare Part D, Medicare Interactive outlines the steps to appeal an unfavorable coverage decision.

To dig deeper into Medicare, you can subscribe to MI Pro. Subscribers can access exclusive in-depth Medicare content, quizzes to test their progress, and printable learning tools. You can keep track of where you left off within each course, and complete coursework at your own pace. You can find out which courses are right for you by taking the free self-assessment.

Medicare Interactive provided over 2 million answers to Medicare questions last year alone. The Medicare Rights Center, which works to ensure access to affordable health care for older adults and people with disabilities, is excited to be teaming up with the COPD Foundation to bring Medicare Interactive direct to the COPD community.

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‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Airway Hyperactivity’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Airway Hyperactivity’.

What is ‘Airway Hyperactivity’?

When looked up, the term ‘airway hyperactivity’ is said to be increased airway sensitivity maybe due to various etiological factors or the key feature of asthma characterized by an exaggerated constriction of the airways to irritants.

Those irritants which someone with COPD and/or severe Asthma may find to be a major problem, may be nothing but normal to most folks.  When you may have this condition of ‘airway hyperactivity’ you may develop a persistent cough.

‘Airway hyperactivity’ can be caused by a wide range of diseases including Anaphylaxis, Autoimmune Disorder, C1 esterase Inhibitor Deficiency, Chronic Urticaria, Hereditary Angioedema, Leukemia, Thyroid Autoimmunity.

‘Airway hyperactivity’ can also be caused by irritations from such items as ACE inhibitors, Animal Dander, Antivenom Preparation, Aspirin, Chemotherapy Agents, Chocolates, Cold Weather, a Dental Procedure, Drug Allergy, Emotional stress, Exposure to Sunlight, Food Additives, Fresh Berries, Milk, Opiates, Peanuts, Penicillin, Post Infection, Preservatives, Radiocontrast Agents, Shellfish, Snake Bites, Sulfonamides, Tomatoes and a Tonsillectomy.

Many times, physicians who use the term ‘airway hyperactivity’ do not have or have not scheduled a pulmonary function test for the patient who is showing signs of the situation.

With that, we ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS and today we ask, “Were you ever told you had ‘airway hyperactivity and if so why and what was the major irritant in your case?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

‘Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Preoccupied and Noticing

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Wow, has it really been that long (three weeks) since I last posted anything about the travels of life with ‘Lenny’ and Me.

All I can do is say, “it happens.”  Now I know that doesn’t sound like much, but it’s all I have and all I can offer – hence the title of today’s posting being ‘Preoccupied and Noticing’.

The ‘preoccupied’ part is just what it is, getting so caught up in life itself that you get sidetracked from some of your normal routine or patterns of life to the point that it may even seem as if you have fallen completely off the normal road of life that you travel – that was me the past few weeks.

The last we shared I was celebrating a brief 36-hour visit from our oldest grandson and all the joys, sharing and love that went with it.  We also talked about the anxiety of preparing to have a EGD (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy) done as I had not had my system checked in nearly 50 years, which surprised the doctors after I explained to them that I was born without an esophagus and it had to be reattached to the top of my stomach system.

Starting with that, I can say it went better than I was maybe expecting and despite still feeling as if I was having some difficulties swallowing over the following three days, the procedure did seem to do what they were hoping as they dilated my swallowing system (in other words they stretched it out) as it did have several spots where it was narrowing.

Even better for me, the folks that put me under took serious my COPD/Asthma condition and monitored everything very closely which kept ‘Lenny’ from getting riled up and causing an undue problem.

By the end of a week, I could feel a good change in eating as swallowing was not the major effort it had been previously, though due to having one side of my larynx paralyzed I still must be careful with eating too fast and trying to swallow too much at once.

The preoccupied stuff continued though as two of our five adult children were running into bumps in their life travels that could have major consequences – stuff I will not go into detail with, but stuff that as a parent can and will just push you to the emotional limit of exhaustion.

In the process, ‘Lenny’ seemed to know I was walking an edge and politely began to cause little spats of problems whenever I seemed to want to stretch myself and try to walk or do something which might push my limits of lungs and heart both – the noticing part.  While ‘Lenny’ did not fire up any major flare-ups or exacerbations, the spats were enough to frustrate me and cause my oxygen levels to drop enough that it just seemed like I had just run at least a mini-marathon when I had done no such thing.  Those spats just made me feel exhausted and wanting to dose off without any warning at all.

One thing I do have a temptation to do when I get preoccupied or stressed – is eat, and those of us that have problems with COPD, Asthma and maybe some heart issues know that being overweight or trying to run at an uncomfortable weight is never a good thing and I was reaching that point.

So, this past few days, while our one adult child begins hammering away at the roller coaster called a divorce, I realized that that uncomfortable weight may be much of my problem with ‘Lenny’ and feeling fatigued – so I am back watching everything and anything that I do or may consider eating.  Do I like it no, but that is because I am cutting out nearly all my breads, potatoes and pasta while limiting my dairy, and not being real strong on the number of vegetables and fruits I will devour without complaining it is making meal planning a real challenge.

We will see where it takes us, but I am betting it will go far because I have grandkids to live for and have every intention to survive and celebrate life happenings with each, and every one of them.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

Want to know who ‘Lenny’ is?  ‘Lenny’ is the name I gave my constant companion called COPD/Asthma.  I have found that referring and dealing with my chronic illness as a companion I am less apt to get angry with it, but instead more likely to work with it like you would in a strong relationship.  Besides treating anything with TLC is much better than hammering away at it as if it was an enemy.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer medical founded information.

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – Set 2 of Outside/Inside of Them Lungs

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I am one of those that has been given the honor of traveling life with the companionship of COPD and severe Asthma.

While the honor is many times pushed by the frustration and battle with those companions, I have over time come to grips that it is what it is and I must make the best of it.

I knew I must learn more about this companion the medical folks call COPD and severe Asthma, so I have read about, ask questions about it and spent time nearly every day scouring the internet for information, articles and more.

I also knew it is good to share, so as a writer I decided what better way to share what I am learning and finding than through informational, inspirational and personal writings about my travels with COPD and severe Asthma.

This is part of an on-going series we call ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ and today we give you set two of a six-part set we refer to as ‘Outside/Inside of Them Lungs’.

SET 2 – – ‘Looking at Your Lungs from the Inside’:

When you think of the ‘inside of your lungs’, you of course start with the obvious which would have to be your nose, mouth, the pharynx (back of your throat) and your larynx (or voice box).

Sure, you could simplify it all by saying the breathing process has air entering through the mouth and/or nose, and while most people take that process for granted – those with COPD and/or Asthma do not as even the simple process of inhaling includes three important functions before the air even reaches the lungs.

The air must be prepared by filtering, humidifying and warming it before it even reaches the lungs.  It these do not happen, then the air you will breath would arrive in your lungs too dirty, too dry and too cold – all of which could and would cause breathing irritations.

Filtering your air starts with the tiny hair-like structures called ‘cilia’.  These tiny hair-like structures do the heavy work of filtering out large particles of dirty and dust before they get to your lungs, and yes you will know the stuff as what you may find in a tissue after blowing your nose or sneezing.  When you sneeze or blow your nose and get some stuff in your tissue – consider it notice that those cilia are doing their job.

Gaining moisture or humidity in the air you breath is done by a thin coating of mucous found lined inside your upper airway.  This is also the same process which will  warm the air you breath in from your normal body temperature of around 98.6 degrees.

And that my friends is ‘Set 2’ of ‘Outside/Inside – Your Lungs’.  Next posting in the series will discuss the true workings inside of your lungs or the bronchial tubes, alveoli and of course oxygen exchange.

REFLECTION QUESTION:  When was the last time you stopped to think about the importance of sneezing or blowing the nose?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – Outside/Inside of Them Lungs, Set 1

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I am one of those that has been given the honor of traveling life with the companionship of COPD and severe Asthma.

While the honor is many times pushed by the frustration and battle with those companions, I have over time come to grips that it is what it is and I must make the best of it.

I knew I must learn more about this companion the medical folks call COPD and severe Asthma, so I have read about, ask questions about it and spent time nearly every day scouring the internet for information, articles and more.

I also knew it is good to share, so as a writer I decided what better way to share what I am learning and finding than through informational, inspirational and personal writings about my travels with COPD and severe Asthma.

This is part of an on-going series we call ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ and today we give you set one of a six-part set we refer to as ‘Outside/Inside of Them Lungs’.

Set 1 – – ‘Looking at The Lungs from the Outside’:

Most of us possible have never seen a real pair of lungs except for maybe inside a glass jar, though these days you can find videos on the internet showing healthy and unhealthy lungs, plus simulations on how them lungs are supposed to work inhaling and exhaling.

Looking at a healthy set of lungs you will see a pair of tissue masses that resemble a cone shape and should be nice and pink in color while feeling kind of spongy with a lot of elasticity characteristic to them.

Looking from the outside, you just see the outside shell of one of the physical miracles of life – as from the outside, lungs do not show much of the powerful working system of airways that lie within.

One of the finest descriptions I have seen about a set of lungs comes from a book by Jane M. Martin called ‘Live Your Life with COPD’, where she gives the following description of a set of lungs:

“Kind of like when you look at a building from the street, you don’t see all the rooms and hallways, the elevators and passageways, the heating and cooling ducts, and all the internal wires and cables.  Yet, you know they’re in there, because you know that the building works.”

The same holds true with your lungs.  Inside that spongy, pink tissue looking thing there are many, many tubes through which your air flows and there are also tiny blood vessels that carry the blood out into your body with the much needed oxygen in tow.

Yep, from the outside you just know that wonders do happen every time those lungs take in and then let out a breathe, and yet from the outside you just can’t see it but just know it happens because without it happening you would not be surviving and reading what I am writing.

And that my friends, is just plain and simple an explanation of them lungs of yours being looked out from the outside.  In our next set of ‘Outside/Inside of Them Lungs’ we will begin taking a tour of the inside of them lungs and begin to peek around the wonders and necessity of breathing.

REFLECTION QUESTION:  Have you ever had the chance to see either a healthy or unhealthy pair of lungs?  Have you ever had the chance to see them in action from the look of the outside?  If so, share your thoughts about the experience.

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)