Reflections of COPD/Asthma – #3 of Keys to Breathing Risks – Pollutants

Standard

As a writer, I find it important to share what I learn with others so that they also may gain knowledge needed to have more secure footing when they battle their own illness or chronic disease.

Taking my responsibility for learning as much as I can about my own COPD/Asthma is something I choose to do so to make myself more aware of what is happening now, what may happen at any moment and what may lay ahead as I travel my path of life with the companionship of COPD/Asthma.

Today we talk about part three of our four-part series titled ‘Keys to Breathing Risks’ – with part three being a short discussion about pollutants.

While many of us who already have COPD/Asthma are familiar with these keys, there is always the need to remind ourselves and other of them, and this is especially true if you know someone besides yourself who may be a risk of being diagnosed with COPD/Asthma.

POLLUTANTS!!

Pollutants alone could be discussed over several postings, but here we hit the basics and touch on the variety and styles of common pollutants that can and will upset those lungs that are already battling COPD and/or severe Asthma.

Yes, pollutants are everywhere if you really think about it, with those that will affect the lungs the most coming from factories, transportation and the gasses and mists from various cleaning chemicals.

Since those pollutants from factories and transportation are somewhat obvious, let us consider the pollutants that maybe are not so obvious or considered.

Items like the fumes from oil fryers, especially the large ones you find in the food service industry.  Even with proper ventilation, the fumes from these when they are being used will spill out into the open air.

And it’s not just when you are using the fryers that fumes are a potential hazard, consider when you are cleaning them with chemicals.  In order to clean them properly they still have to be warm to hot and when those cleaning chemicals hit the fryer, just think of the steam/smoke they through out into the air.

How about the pollutants than can be found right underneath your nose, in your home.  Over a long period of time, many of those cleaning chemicals, personal items and more can be found to be very harmful to a set of lungs, especially if you already are having problems.

Household pollutants will obviously include many of the cleaning chemicals a person may be using, but have you considered those fabric softners used with laundry or how about air freshners used to upgrade the aroma in your home?

What about the personal products you may be using for yourself such as shampoos, hairsprays, deodorant sprays and yes, those ‘what you thought smelled good’ perfumes and colognes.

While not everyone will react the same way too many of these items, over a long period of time – many of these items can and will be found to irritate the lungs and even the eyes.

If you are raising teen-age daughters or sons, they may need to be educated in the can and can’t do’s of wearing perfumes and/or colognes for the sake of others and their breathing.

PERSONAL NOTE: This writer has a lifelong history of severe asthma, many times kicked in by a person’s perfume and/or cologne, the aroma of a fabric softner or the aerosol from a can of deodorant.  This writer sits in the back, at the end of most events for a reason – in case we have a reaction to somebody sitting nearby.  Most recently my wife has finally accepted a change in fabric softner, because the one we have been using for years is now irritating my lungs like never before.

If you, or someone you know has allergies or asthma – then you need to maybe consider making the sacrifice of changing items used around the house and for your own personal grooming in order for the person or yourself can live with less reactions and live with better breathing.

One thing about COPD and/or Asthma – while many may react similarly, everyone reacts in their own pattern to each and every possible pollutant.  Sometimes you may have to just test and adjust something like fabric softners, before finding one that does not cause further harm to a precious set of lungs that may live among you.

So beware of not only the obvious pollutants around us such as factories and transportation, but also those sitting right in front of you at the restaurant you either eat or work at and most importantly, right amongst your world at home.  And most important – be willing to make the changes necessary.

REFLEDTION QUESTION – – What are the most influential pollutants that you have found that may or do cause a slight or major irritation to your importance of breathing?

As always, CrossDove Writer reminds you that if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various news/health websites, COPD Foundation’s “Big Fat Reference Guide on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” and the book “Live Your Life with COPD”)

(Images used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

Advertisements

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – #1 of Keys to Breathing Risks

Standard

As a writer, I find it important to share what I learn with others so that they also may gain knowledge needed to have more secure footing when they battle their own illness or chronic disease.

Taking my responsibility for learning as much as I can about my own COPD/Asthma is something I choose to do so to make myself more aware of what is happening now, what may happen at any moment and what may lay ahead as I travel my path of life with the companionship of COPD/Asthma.

With all that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help remind people, both those affected by the disease and those family and friends that surround them, of the ideas, research, diagnoses, game-plans and all that goes with keeping the battles at a distance.

Today we begin a four-part series dealing with the ‘Keys to Breathing Risks’ – with Part #1 being those signs or moments when you may be discovering COPD/Asthma could be your problem.

While many of us who already have COPD/Asthma are familiar with these keys, there is always the need to remind ourselves and other of them, and this is especially true if you know someone besides yourself who may be a risk of being diagnosed with COPD/Asthma.

We have three key moments in a person’s life travels where they may realize that breathing was becoming a problem and probably should get it checked out.

Situation number one – Having spells where you get short of breath.

You should talk with your healthcare provider about any signs of being or having episodes of shortness of breath, and that means consistent signs of shortness of breath no matter what the activity you may be doing.

While being short of breath may well be a sign of several other possible health issues, it is also a major key in early diagnoses of asthma, emphysema, lung cancer, chronic bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Situation number two – Having a chronic or annoying cough.

You should talk with your healthcare provider about any constant, chronic or annoying cough.

Again, a chronic cough is very annoying and may also be a sign of your lungs having a problem with releasing the remains of the breath you may have just taken.  And that my friend is a sign of a possibility you may be gaining on a chronic lung issue or breathing issue.

Situation number three – You are finding yourself having trouble keeping up your stamina or ability to do what has been normal activities including yard work, house work, cooking, playing sports or just walking.

If you can connect getting a case of being short of breath and/or chronic coughing while trying to do any normal activities, then you should see your healthcare provider and get it checked out.

All three of these ‘Keys to Breathing Risk’ may not necessarily find you with a diagnosis of COPD or severe Asthma, the odds are that if you have any signs of them you probably are most likely having some type of health issue that could be or may become much more serious.

Always remember that without having access to consistent and productive breathing – your daily activities and functions may well suffer.

If you doubt that statement, then look around and ask someone you may know that is having a serious issue with their breathing and see what they may think of the signs you may see in your own breathing productivity.

Trust me, getting diagnosed and diagnosed properly is a lot easier if you do it earlier than later because catching any type of lung/breathing disease early is always more proactive than waiting.

From a personal experience – this writer for many, many years was treated for just his asthma and we missed an earlier diagnosis of COPD before it reached a stage of major concern and major change of normal routine.

QUESTION OF REFLECTION – – This week we ask you to reflect on the time when you were first diagnosed with having a major lung and/or breathing issue and share with how you felt and did you feel you caught it early enough or were you irritated because you waiting too long to get the proper diagnoses?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, CrossDove Writer reminds you that if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various news/health websites, COPD Foundation’s “Big Fat Reference Guide on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” and the book “Live Your Life with COPD”)

(Images used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – E-Cigarettes & COPD – Cautionary Vaping

Standard

It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Many, if not most, of those with COPD in particular were smokers or spent a bunch of their life around a smoker or smokers.  Whether you smoke or not, the following write was found wandering the internet and we found it particularly interesting – it will give you all something to think about, especially if you are or were a smoker.

Special Note – Is this subject personal, yes, it is.  Much of my childhood was spent around a father and a couple of relatives who smoked either a pipe or cigarettes, which I have at moments blamed for some of my situation fighting late Stage III COPD while also dealing with severe Asthma.  Having had to walk through groups or individuals who were vaping, I found absolutely no difference in my physical reaction to the situation – in other words I either held my breath walking past or run the risk of sniffy even a hint of the vapors and like with regular smoking, set my COPD/Asthma into a tizzy.

With that, read on and see if you can relate to this particular problem with your larynx when using an inhaler.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

E-Cigarettes and COPD: Cautions if you’re Vaping

E-Cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular among smokers, non-smokers and those trying to quit smoking. There are some cautions, however, that you may want to keep in mind if you’re vaping (using e-cigarettes) or considering it. e-cigarettes and copd

How They Work

Before getting into the details about the cautions of vaping, it’s important to understand how these devices work. First, the user inhales through a mouthpiece which switches on a small, battery-powered heater. The heat vaporizes a small cartridge containing liquid nicotine and propylene glycol (PEG), then the user gets a puff of hot gas, exhales and finally releases a cloud of vapor created by the PEG.

Using Them to Quit Smoking

If you smoke or are working on quitting smoking, you already know how important quitting is for your health and well-being. Many people have been turning to vaping to help them quit smoking, but the results and risks vary.

In 2010, an online survey showed that 96% of the 3,587 participants surveyed admitted that using e-cigarettes helped them quit smoking and 92% of participants mentioned it made them smoke less.2 However, Michael Eriksen, Director of the Institute of Public Health at Atlanta’s Georgia State University, noted that these products are sold as something for you to use in situations where you normally wouldn’t be able to smoke—and this will just encourage you to use more nicotine, not reduce the frequency you smoke.1

Carl Philips, PhD, and Scientific Director of Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association (CASAA), cautions people on how quitting-smoking rates are reported and determined: People who no longer smoke combustible cigarettes and instead use e-cigarettes are considered former smokers. This is because of the keyword: smoke. E-cigarettes, like smokeless tobacco, don’t involve inhaling smoke, meaning results of a near 100% quit rate can be shown because those who vape can call themselves non-smokers.3

Immediate Effects

Initial research has been done to determine if there are any immediate effects on individuals who use e-cigarettes and to determine if there is a relationship between e-cigarettes and COPD. Dr. Sofia Vakali, a researcher who helped conduct this study, monitored smokers with COPD, smokers with asthma, smokers with no symptoms and nonsmokers to determine adverse effects of vaping. Below are the symptoms users experienced:

Sore Throat

62% of those with COPD

91% of those with asthma

74% of nonsmokers

65% of smokers

Cough

69% of those with COPD

66% of those with asthma

54% of nonsmokers

69% of smokers

Other symptoms all groups experienced were eye irritation and dry mouth.

Potential Long-Term Harm

One of the biggest uncertainties with vaping is that the long-term consequences for someone who stops inhaling cigarette tars and just inhales nicotine are unknown.1 Other sources point out that vaping still allows substances into your lungs that are not meant to be inhaled.3

Other Factors to Consider

A research paper in Tobacco Control noted that e-cigarettes are missing important regulations such as proper labeling, health warnings, clear directions and ways to safely dispose the product. The researchers also found that some of the cartridges leaked, which may expose you to a toxic level of nicotine. Since these products are lacking regulation, how much you are able to inhale the substance and the exact substances used are left up to the manufacturer.

(Sources used for this article – WebMD, About COPD, Forbes and MedPage Today)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Weighty Frustration

Standard

‘Lenny’ is my constant companion the doctors call COPD/Asthma.  Naming my constant health companion seems to make life easier for me in relating to my disease as it gives it a bit of a personality.  Besides treating ‘Lenny’ as a companion, come good days or bad, is much better than always dealing with it as an enemy.

Let’s see where ‘Lenny’ and Me have been most recently – Weighty Frustration!!

Yep, weighty frustration is a good title for this write as weight can and is a problem and fighting it is a never-ending battle of frustration, especially when one has a problem with something like COPD/Asthma – both of which can be easily triggered by such a valuable thing as exercise.

Considering I weighed maybe 145 pounds dripping wet when I came out of high school, I often wonder just how the heck I got to the point I am at now by tipping the scales at just a few pounds plus a hundred over that weight.

I spent many years in the food service industry and believe it or not, never had a problem with major weight gain.  Then I spent a couple of years in traveling sales and my weight went well beyond what it should be and now I must get it down and the process seems very, very frustrating.

When I had my massive heart attack four and one-half years ago I lost over 20 pounds in fluids immediately and since then the game has been on to lose another 30-40 pounds’ minimum.

Of course, one way to lose the weight would be to get some good exercise in every day, unfortunately that is where my being a procrastinator and ‘Lenny’ raising a small fit when I walk more than a few blocks – well that idea just struggles more than not.

Diets, heck yes, I have tried diets but then I get the schedule changed and/or family arrives and then everything falls out of step.  It’s just harder to keep eating things that nobody else is when everyone else seems to be there to eat.

In my mind, I know I need to lose this weight and in my mind, I fight a battle everyday thinking about what I should eat, what diet I should try, what exercise should I do that may not tick ‘Lenny’ off – you get the picture.  Even had the doctor put into a program called ‘lose it’ and for nine-plus months I followed it religiously and did as much exercising as I could without irritating ‘Lenny’ and all I got was a two-pound loss and the same roller coaster ride I have always had with a weight that would bounce up and down like an old red rubber ball.

So, with a doctor checkup due on Tuesday, I have resigned myself to knowing he will not be happy with my weight, but trust me, he will not be anywhere near as irritated as I am – so goes my weighty frustration.

With the spring flinging by and summer soon to have melted us down, once again I came through the winter with a weight that has not gained much of any upswing, but then again it has also not been willing to take any kind of significant downturn either.

So maybe I am asking for advice, as with my COPD/Asthma my exercising is more limited than I would want – but surely out there in the great big world full of over expensive advice there may be even one little clue or support that would make me beat back my seemingly daily war with weighty frustration.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

Follow all the adventures of “‘Lenny’ and Me 4 Today” at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at “COPD Travels”.

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – COPD/Asthma and the Weather – Part 2

Standard

It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a new weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

With the weather recently having trouble in figuring out if it still had some winter to throw at folks before spring totally settles in, it seems logical to touch base with the effects of COPD/Asthma from what is happening with the weather.

So, let’s see just what possible effects that you should be watching for when the weather may be getting ready to change or may be settling in for a lengthy period of being either hot or cold and/or dry or humid.

Special Note – This writer, who has been a severe asthmatic since early childhood, remembers his mother referring to him as her human barometer because when the weather was getting ready to change, she would know just by the changes in my breathing or lung stamina.  So, for nearly a lifetime, this writer has dealt with the weather and the games it plays on my lungs and breathing.

With that I encourage you to go back and check on my previous posting if you missed it, part one that is, because this is part two of a lengthy article which I put together from a posting on a medical internet site for which I forgot to write the name down of when I copied to share the article itself.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

The Connection Between COPD and Weather – Part 2

Tips to Help You Weather the Elements –

You’ll have to pay close attention to the weather for the good of your lungs, and sometimes that means you shouldn’t interact with the great outdoors. But it’s not always a good idea to shut yourself up inside, especially is your indoor space isn’t quite as clean and clear as you would hope.

Get a handle on when to stay in, when to venture out, and how to counteract some of the discomforts that are impossible to avoid.

Perfect Your Timing –

If weather alerts are on, it’s best to stay inside, where you know the air is more comfortable to breathe. When you need to step out, you should plan around the early to late afternoon; mornings and evenings are generally cooler, and the air quality is often at its best.

In winter, it’s a good idea to wait until the wind dies down, since a brisk breeze can challenge your airways as much as a fluctuation in temperature. Wrap a scarf around your face, and try to breathe through your nose to avoid shocking your airways.

Control Your Humidity –

Air purifiers can help rid the air of all sorts of irritants, but a simple dehumidifier (or humidifier) may be all you need to breathe better at home. This is especially important when you live in a changeable climate, where severe winters and humid summers can send your humidity levels up and down.

Whichever model you choose, be sure to clean it regularly – as particles build up on the filter, and old water is left to sit in the reservoir, your device won’t work as well (and might become a breeding ground for more irritants).

Turn up Your Air Conditioner –

Cooler, drier air in your home can fight the effects of heavy humidity, but running an air conditioner also means that the windows and doors stay shut. Not only will this reduce the chances of mold spores and dust mites multiplying, you’ll also limit the number of outdoor irritants that make their way into your indoor space.

Not too long ago, doctors would often recommend a cross-country move for better breathing, but most experts today agree that the solution is not that simple. The fact that weather impacts lung disease is undeniable, but the way it affects each person’s COPD can differ.

It’s important that, above all else, you listen to your body and note how it your lungs react to various changes. Keeping track in a COPD journal may illuminate some triggers or potential sources of relief that you had not thought of before.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – #4 of the ‘5 Myths of COPD’

Standard

As a writer, I find it important to share what I learn with others so that they also may gain knowledge needed to have more secure footing when they battle their own illness or chronic disease.

Taking my responsibility for learning as much as I can about my COPD/Asthma is something I choose to do so to make myself more aware of what is happening now, what may happen at any moment and what may lay ahead as I travel my path of life with the companionship of COPD/Asthma.

With all that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help remind people, both those affected by the disease and those family and friends that surround them, of the ideas, research, diagnoses, game-plans and all that goes with keeping the battles at a distance.

Today we discuss or refresh your knowledge of part four of a five-part series on the ‘5 Myths of COPD/Asthma that can make you sicker’ if you let them.

COPD Myth #4: “People with COPD can’t exercise.”

When a person has problems with their breathing the last thing they seem to think about doing is exercising.

Many people with COPD seem to be afraid of exercising over the fear that it may be unsafe and will make it even more difficult to breathe.  The fact about that attitude is that it is wrong for the simple reason that exercising keeps your lungs and body energized while also helping build and/or keep up your stamina.

They say that even a little routine of exercise, one that gets your heart a pumping and your breathing labored without setting off another wheezing or exacerbation attack.

Many will also say that exercise will help decrease a person’s chances of catching infections and illnesses.  And as we all know that any time somebody with COPD/Asthma gets an infection or illness, the risk rises of ending up in the hospital.

Exercise does not drain a person’s energy, but instead should increase the energy a person will have and help keep the person from hitting as many spots in the day where they feel drained.

One thing a person with COPD/Asthma should do is consult with their physician, pulmonologist and/or a pulmonary rehabilitation tech about the appropriate exercises and breathing techniques that will enable a person to maintain exercising at a level that will be successful in helping lessen those times of being short of breath.

QUESTIONS OF REFLECTION – – For those fighting the battle with COPD/Asthma – what exercise routine or program seems to work best for you so that you get the workout without causing a problem with your breathing?  Is your exercise routine one that was recommended and setup by your medical care folks or is it a routine that you put together?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, CrossDove Writer reminds you that if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > a person without breathing is a person without life itself.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various news/health websites, COPD Foundation’s “Big Fat Reference Guide on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” and the book “Live Your Life with COPD”)

(Images used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

Doubt – – TODAY’S THOUGHT, WORD AND HOPE

Standard

(September 6)

reflections-doubt-faith-05

What better way to share with others who share the daily battle and frustrations with COPD/Asthma than by passing on some daily words and thoughts that bring hope and renewal, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

So take, read, meditate and hopefully find some hope to attach to your faith for today – – – – –

A DAILY THOUGHT, SPIRITUAL WORD & HOPE FOR TODAY!!

THE THOUGHT – from Helen Steiner Rice:

Teach us, dear God,

That the power of prayer

Is made stronger

By placing the world in Your care!

THE SPIRITUAL WORD:

“But when he asks, he must believe and not doubt, because he who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind.”  (James 1:6 NIV)

THE HOPE – on this day, remember to diminish doubt while working on increasing your faith, for doubt can and will play games within your mind, heart and soul.  With faith, we who have any kind of chronic illness  can find that much needed hope for a better tomorrow – but if doubt slips into the traffic of your day you must for your own livelihood find an optional direction to regain faith over doubt as doubt will most likely keep you from fulfilling the wonders of your trip in life while faith will always keep you walking forward in faith that all will be good. (Billy Dursens)

(Copyright@2016, CrossDove Writer)