Reflections of COPD/Asthma – Outside/Inside of Them Lungs, Set 1

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I am one of those that has been given the honor of traveling life with the companionship of COPD and severe Asthma.

While the honor is many times pushed by the frustration and battle with those companions, I have over time come to grips that it is what it is and I must make the best of it.

I knew I must learn more about this companion the medical folks call COPD and severe Asthma, so I have read about, ask questions about it and spent time nearly every day scouring the internet for information, articles and more.

I also knew it is good to share, so as a writer I decided what better way to share what I am learning and finding than through informational, inspirational and personal writings about my travels with COPD and severe Asthma.

This is part of an on-going series we call ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ and today we give you set one of a six-part set we refer to as ‘Outside/Inside of Them Lungs’.

Set 1 – – ‘Looking at The Lungs from the Outside’:

Most of us possible have never seen a real pair of lungs except for maybe inside a glass jar, though these days you can find videos on the internet showing healthy and unhealthy lungs, plus simulations on how them lungs are supposed to work inhaling and exhaling.

Looking at a healthy set of lungs you will see a pair of tissue masses that resemble a cone shape and should be nice and pink in color while feeling kind of spongy with a lot of elasticity characteristic to them.

Looking from the outside, you just see the outside shell of one of the physical miracles of life – as from the outside, lungs do not show much of the powerful working system of airways that lie within.

One of the finest descriptions I have seen about a set of lungs comes from a book by Jane M. Martin called ‘Live Your Life with COPD’, where she gives the following description of a set of lungs:

“Kind of like when you look at a building from the street, you don’t see all the rooms and hallways, the elevators and passageways, the heating and cooling ducts, and all the internal wires and cables.  Yet, you know they’re in there, because you know that the building works.”

The same holds true with your lungs.  Inside that spongy, pink tissue looking thing there are many, many tubes through which your air flows and there are also tiny blood vessels that carry the blood out into your body with the much needed oxygen in tow.

Yep, from the outside you just know that wonders do happen every time those lungs take in and then let out a breathe, and yet from the outside you just can’t see it but just know it happens because without it happening you would not be surviving and reading what I am writing.

And that my friends, is just plain and simple an explanation of them lungs of yours being looked out from the outside.  In our next set of ‘Outside/Inside of Them Lungs’ we will begin taking a tour of the inside of them lungs and begin to peek around the wonders and necessity of breathing.

REFLECTION QUESTION:  Have you ever had the chance to see either a healthy or unhealthy pair of lungs?  Have you ever had the chance to see them in action from the look of the outside?  If so, share your thoughts about the experience.

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)