Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Orthopnea’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word ‘Orthopnea’.

Orthopnea’ is used in describing difficulty breathing because of your body position, especially when the SoB (Short of Breath) happens when lying or sleeping while on your back.  A person having this difficulty is likely to use several pillows just to be able to breathe better when resting or sleeping.

This kind of disorder can be and should be considered very dangerous and if left untreated can possible cause death while the patient sleeps.

COPD and Asthma patients are commonly found with this sleeping disorder and need to work with it while battling their own individual battle with COPD/Asthma.

Orthopnea’ must be taken seriously as it is not only a sign of lungs being congested but also could be giving your warning signals that your heart is not functioning properly.  When you lay flat the blood that is in your feet and legs become evenly distributed to your entire body which if you’re healthy is no big deal as the lungs and heart can handle it, but if you’re not healthy it will cause problems with the heart and your lungs will not be able to handle the extra fluids and weight.

To know if your sleeping difficulties are ‘Orthopnea’ a person needs to look for some of the more common signs and symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’ such shortness of breath while lying flat, swollen feet and/or ankles, need of pillows when sleeping and/or laying down and coughing on a regular basis while laying down.  Medical folks also say being overweight can also cause ‘Orthopnea’.

Personal Note – This writer, while having been diagnosed with sleep apnea, is familiar with the symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’ because I have fought that difficulty since I was a little kid.  Always needing extra pillows and never sleep flat on my back because it would cause a problem for my breathing or asthma and in more recent times with my COPD.

If adjusting your head and/or body’s height so that sleep may remedy ‘Orthopnea’ for a while, but if the difficulty of sleeping continues then you must consult your physician.

With all that, we ask you the readers if you have symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’, how or have you found solutions?  As always, we look forward to hearing your input – thanx.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Nebulizer’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing our ‘Nebulizer’.

The word ‘Nebulizer’ is the reference to a machine that people use to convert liquid medications into a mist that can then be easily inhaled by using of a mouthpiece and/or mask.  Using a liquid medication with a ‘Nebulizer’ is commonly used as an alternative to using a metered dose inhaler.

Since a ‘Nebulizer’ is now built in smaller, sleek machines, the liquid medication/nebulizer can be prescribed by a physician and/or pulmonologist for use at a persons home.  Anymore, the cost of the ‘Nebulizer’ machine will be considered for payment under most insurance programs.

Using a ‘Nebulizer’ is simple, as it takes a liquid medication – that is normally provided in a pre-measured vile – and turns it into a fine mist for which the patient would then inhale either through a mouthpiece or mask.

Many patients have found that using a liquid medication turned into a mist with a ‘Nebulizer’ is much more effective than the inhalers they had been using, despite the machine itself is a bit less convenient to use.

Luckily, anymore many of the ‘Nebulizer’ units available for purchase to use at home are small enough to easily fit into a handbag or small luggage bag when needing to travel.  Some even come with convertors to make the ‘Nebulizer’ available for use in a car or camper.

While the majority of patients will be given a ‘Nebulizer’ that uses compressed air to create a mist from the liquid, there is a second-type which instead will use ultrasound to break the liquid down into a finer mist than those from a compressed air unit.

This author is very familiar with the compressed air ‘Nebulizer’ and finds that using it once per day (to start off my morning) does seem to make a difference in getting the old lungs cleared out in the morning and making them more functional for the day ahead.  Plus using a mist medication is easier on my throat than nearly any inhaler.

With all that, we ask you the readers if you use a ‘Nebulizer’ as part of your daily routine, do you feel that using the inhaled mist medication work better for you in your battle with COPD and/or Asthma?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Irritants’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing our ‘Irritants’.

‘Irritants’ are those substances which can and will cause irritation to the airways of those with COPD/Asthma, as those of us with either of these diseases know.

When ‘Irritants’ begin to agitate the air-ways, they will cause swelling and force an increase in a persons mucous production, which in turn can cause responses such as coughing, sneezing and wheezing.

While each person will have their own list of ‘Irritants’ that may cause triggers of major breathing problems, those ‘Irritants’ deemed some of the worst and consistent in most cases of COPD/Asthma would be smoke, smog, aerosol sprays, perfume/colognes and fumes from transportation vehicles, factories and even heavy duty kitchens.

In your own individual battles with COPD and/or Asthma, be sure to know, learn and understand those ‘Irritants’ which cause your major or minor battles to happen.  When you learn to identify those trigger ‘Irritants’, you can then work at shutting down the irritation through knowledge and possible not just through medications.

So be sure to explore, educate and remember the ins and outs of those ‘Irritants’ which you find cause your COPD and/or Asthma the most irritation and breathing flare-ups.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘HEPA Filters’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of cleaner air by using ‘HEPA Filters’.

‘HEPA’ stands for ‘high-efficiency particulate air’ or a specially designed filter that removes nearly all tiny particles from the air.

While air filters for home heating/air conditioning systems are always necessary, those folks with chronic illnesses and/or disabilities (especially when they include asthma, severe allergies, COPD, and other lung/sinus difficulties) should always be using specific ‘HEPA’ filters because of their outstanding ability to trap smaller, tiny airborne particles that could otherwise irritate the lungs and/or sinuses.

HEPA-Filters--004 A ‘HEPA filter’ is designed to trap even minute pollen, dog/cat dander and dust-mite feces type particles.  These filters can be found and used in home heating/air conditioning systems, vacuum cleaners, air cleaners and even some wood shop equipment.

When using ‘HEPA Filters’, and it is recommended, you should be sure to schedule monthly checks and change them as often as necessary to keep the air environment around you as clean and ‘trigger’ free as possible.

In your own individual battle with COPD and/or Asthma, be sure to learn and understand the words of the language of the chronic illnesses for knowing the words/language is so helpful with knowing what is going on within those individual battles – and today that word of importance is ‘HEPA’ FILTERS.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Gas Exchange’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we actually use a two-word phrase in discussing ‘Gas Exchange’.

‘Gas Exchange’ is that process of exchanging oxygen for carbon dioxide in a persons blood.  This exchange of gases takes place through the very thin walls of the alveoli when oxygen is passed from the lungs to the blood system while in return carbon dioxide is taken into the lungs to be expelled from a person’s body.

As we have discussed previously, the ‘alveoli’ while great in numbers are yet so small and so very important in the ‘gas exchange’ of the incoming oxygen to work in the blood system and the much-needed removal of carbon dioxide out of the human system.

If and/or when your ‘alveoli’ begin/or do not perform as they should, you will at times during that ‘gas exchange’ process get air trapped within your ‘alveoli’ which will make it harder for a person to exhale the air taken in and the ‘gas exchange’ of getting the carbon dioxide out.  When this begins to happen a person may feel a full or tightness in their chest.

A medical test used for checking your lungs ability to make this vital ‘gas exchange’ is called a ‘Diffusion Capacity Test’ which measures how much carbon monoxide remains in the air you exhale, a low diffusion capacity is what helps indicate the presence of and severity of a variety of lung diseases.

While administered oxygen will help in the amount of oxygen a person may get it does not necessarily help in getting the ‘carbon dioxide’ out.  In extreme emergency situations a person will be given the option of ‘intubation’ in which a tube is placed in the windpipe to help that person with their ‘gas exchange’ and reduce the labor or work needed in breathing.

In your own individual battle with COPD and/or asthma, be sure to learn and understand the words of importance in understanding what is going on within these battles – today that word of importance is ‘Gas Exchange’ – know and understand how ‘Gas Exchange’ can affect your COPD/Asthma.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘FEV1’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With all that in mind, let’s discuss the word ‘FEV1’.

‘FEV1’ is the short version of ‘forced expiratory volume in the first second’ which is a test to see how well your lungs function.

This test measures the volume of air you can force out in one second after taking the deepest breath you can during a Pulmonary Function Test.  The measurement taken will fall as your airway become more constricted.

A patients ‘FEV1’ measurement is what pulmonologists use when determining the degree of airway obstruction that patient may have.  The measurement they get from a ‘FEV1’ test is what is most commonly used to gauge a presence and severity of COPD.

These numbers may vary according to a patient’s age, height, race, weight and gender, so when a pulmonologist interprets a patients FEV1 number they do so depending on what is expected in an average person of that patients demographic grouping.

If your pulmonologist is using the system developed by the Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) then the severity of a patient’s COPD is divided into four grades or stages classified by spirometry measurement, with those being the following:

> > GOLD/Stage 1 or Mild – – a FEV1 reading of greater than or equal to 80%

> > GOLD/Stage 2 or Moderate – – a FEV1 reading of between 50-79%

> > GOLD/Stage 3 or Severe – – a FEV1 reading of between 30-49%

> > GOLD/Stage 4 or Very Severe – – a FEV1 reading of less than 30%

We could easily go on about a person’s spirometry test and their FEV1 numbers for much longer, but for now this is the basics and the must know for anyone battling COPD/Asthma.

In your own individual battle with COPD and/or asthma, be sure to learn and understand the words of importance in understanding what is going on within these battles – today that word of importance is ‘FEV1’ – know and understand your FEV1 number.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Failure’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With all that in mind, let’s discuss the word ‘Failure’.

‘Failure’ is defined as ‘the condition or fact of not achieving the desired end or ends’.  Yes, to some ‘failure’ is really dependent on how it is referenced, as in some circumstances what is considered ‘failure’ to one person may actually be a success to another.

Another reference to the word ‘failure’ would be ‘nonperformance of what has been requested or expected’, while another could an ‘act or fact of failing to pass a test or assignment’ and yet one more could be ‘the cessation of proper functioning or performance’.

You may be asking yourself, why is ‘failure’ a word that should be known with the battles we fight with COPD and/or Asthma?

Because when you are fighting a chronic illness/disease such as COPD and/or Asthma, you will be hearing the word over and over – ‘failure’ of the lungs working, ‘failure’ of a med you tried, ‘failure’ of seeing the trigger that just set off an exacerbation or ‘failure’ in life because you have a chronic illness.

Instead of looking at the negative side of ‘failure’ though, we with these battles of COPD/Asthma or any chronic illness should work hard every day of seeing beyond what would be considered a failure to others.

In other words, the idea of ‘failure’ being a true negative would be only if and when a person fighting any chronic illness stops learning about it, stops working with it or stops living with it.

NEVER stop trying to learn more about your COPD and/or Asthma, for you never know when you might learn something about the battle that will put it all in a new light.  Besides, when you stop trying to learn about your COPD and/or Asthma, you are being a ‘failure’ to yourself, your human machine as well as to the tribe of folks that surround you in this path of life you have been given.

NEVER stop working with your COPD and/or Asthma, for working on exercises that involve breathing and body conditioning is what is needed to extend your living – for if you do not keep up the exercising and conditioning and your life is cut shorter than may be already, then you have produced a ‘failure’ to yourself and to those in the tribe of folks that surround you in this path of life you have been given.

NEVER stop living or working at living with your COPD and/or Asthma, for living with your chronic illness means to push yourself on those days your body says no, to push yourself to take the meds required on those days your mind and body may be saying enough is enough or pushing yourself to be there for the tribe that surrounds you – for when you stop pushing yourself, you stop working at living, then you have been a ‘failure’ to yourself and those in the tribe of folks that surround you in this path of life you have been given.

The ‘failure’ of our lungs is a positive in that it gives a person the unique path of living that most do not have, which in retrospect gives a person a unique way to help others see the world and how it could be if they themselves do not stop ‘failing’ themselves by smoking, drinking or just working in and around every day triggers that can and will mess up your way of living.

So, please note that ‘failure’ is not an option for those with COPD and/or Asthma, because failing to learn, work and live with our chronic illness will most likely bring more pain, more suffering and more disappointment in a much faster time frame than expected for yourself and those in the tribe around you.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)