Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Emotions’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Emotions’.

What is ‘Emotions’ and Why is it an important word with COPD and/or Emotions?

Emotions are something which we may be feeling nearly every moment of a lifetime.

When asked, we bet that a person can rattle off a minimum of six to ten emotions or more in a matter of half a minute or less, as emotions can detail a huge range of our reactions to life itself, such as anger, anxiousness, cheerfulness, depression, fear, enthusiasm, grief, happy, joy, sad, stress and worry to name a few.

Why would the word emotions be of much importance to those of us that battle COPD and/or Asthma daily – because our emotions can and will indirectly affect how are COPD and/or Asthma may react during each, and every day.

Studies have been done that show links between COPD and/or Asthma, noting that it is a fact that feeling strong emotions alone may not be enough to cause you to develop a situation with your COPD and/or Asthma.

But if you already have COPD and/or Asthma, experiencing a range of emotions can certainly cause a flare up or even an exacerbation.

The reason why – when a person is dealing with any type of emotion, your breathing can change and become either quicker and shallower depending on the emotion.  If your airways may be particularly sensitive, emotions may be enough to set a COPD and/or Asthma attack into partial or full gear.

When you stop and evaluate some of the reactions made to certain emotions, you will find your breathing is affected by crying, yelling or laughing.  Other emotions such as depression, anger, stress, worry, enthusiasm and fear can cause a person to let their guard down, which in turn could lead to a trigger slipping by and setting off another battle with that persons COPD and/or Asthma.

So yes, emotions will be a word that needs to be kept on the front burner sort to speak, as so many of them can and will affect a person’s physical body, which in turn can and will possible affect the lungs and the breathing.

There is much more that can be said here, but the point to be made is the importance to realize and understand how the word ‘emotions’ can and will affect your life and the continuing battle which you have with COPD and/or Asthma.

At this point when we are ending our discussion of the moment, we always like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS, and today we ask, “Have you noticed emotions affecting your COPD and/or Asthma, and if so, which emotions seem to cause the most concern in setting off an incident with your COPD and/or Asthma?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person living a life in constant caution’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

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Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Diffusion Capacity’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Diffusion Capacity’.

What is ‘Diffusion Capacity’?

When you have a diagnosis of COPD and/or Asthma, your lungs are unable to transfer oxygen into your blood as easily as it should, and when that is a problem your physician and/or pulmonologist will request a test for your ‘Diffusion Capacity’ that will measure how effectively the gas exchange between your air sacs and your bloodstream is working.

Lung diffusion testing will measure how well the lungs exchange those gases and is an important part of lung testing because the major function of the lungs is to allow oxygen to ‘diffuse’ or pass into the blood from the lungs and to allow carbon dioxide to ‘diffuse’ from the blood into the lungs.

When the test that a patient will be given to check on their ‘diffusion capacity’ is requested, the patient will have clips put on their nose and then they will be given a mouthpiece which will fit tightly around your lips and mouth.  At that point, the patient will be asked to inhale a small (and safe) concentration of carbon monoxide mixed with helium, oxygen and nitrogen.

After inhaling the concentrated mixture, the patient will hold their breath for approximately 10 seconds before rapidly exhaling the concentrated mixture out.  When exhaling, the patient will be sending the concentrated mixture into a machine that will measure the flow and volume of your breath as well as how much of the carbon monoxide was absorbed into your bloodstream during your breath and how much remains in the air that you exhaled.

The results of this test will give your physician and/or pulmonologist an idea of how easy or difficult it is currently for your lungs to transfer gases from the inhaled air into the blood stream.

When low diffusion capacity is found, it can indicate the presence of severe emphysema, as well as several other possible lung diseases.  The test will also determine the level of damage the alveoli or lung structures responsible for gas exchange in the lungs have at the time of the test.

Your physician and/or pulmonologist will also get an idea of the severity of damage to the airways with this test.

One other note, the ‘diffusion capacity’ test normally does not affect those with asthma and will help in a physician and/or pulmonologist distinguish between the asthma and different types of COPD – even when symptoms are similar.

With that, we always like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS, and today we ask, “When was the last time you had a diffusion capacity test done and what were the results?”.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Controlled Coughing’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Controlled Coughing’.

What is ‘Controlled Coughing’?

Controlled Coughing is a technique that helps clear the airways of mucus, but saves energy and oxygen by using only the force needed to loosen and move the mucus.  COPD/Asthma patients learn the controlled coughing technique in pulmonary rehabilitation programs.

Many times, when you have COPD, the disease itself can cause your lungs to produce excess mucus which leads to frequent coughing.  Not all coughs will be effective in clearing excess mucus from your lungs and explosive or uncontrolled coughing causes airways to collapse and spasm, which traps mucus.

With the controlled or effective cough, it comes from deep within the lungs and will have just the right amount of force to loosen and carry mucus through the airways, and do it without causing the airways to narrow or collapse.  When controlled coughing saves energy, the person also saves oxygen.

The effective cough should have similar steps like the following:

  1. Sit on a chair or on the edge of your bed, with both feet on the floor. Lean slightly forward and relax.
  2. Fold your arms across your abdomen and breathe in slowly through your nose. (The power of the cough comes from moving air.)
  3. To exhale you should lean forward, pressing your arms against your abdomen. You should then cough 2-3 times through a slightly open mouth, while keeping the coughs short and sharp.

One thing to note is that the first cough loosens the mucus and moves it through your airways, while the second and third cough should enable you to cough the mucus up and out.

  1. At this point you should breathe in again by ‘sniffing’ slowly and gently through your nose. Doing this gentle breath should help prevent mucus from moving back down your airways.
  2. REST!!
  3. Perform again as needed.

Some tips to follow along with the controlled breathing process would be:

Be sure to avoid breathing in quickly and deeply through your mouth after coughing, as quick breaths will interfere with the movement process of mucus coming up and out of the lungs.  Plus, the quick breathing can cause a problem with uncontrolled coughing.

Unless your physician has advised you to watch your fluid intake, it is advisable to drink at least six to eight glasses of fluid per day, as this will help keep your mucus thinned out which in turn will make coughing much easier.

You should consider using the controlled coughing technique after you use your bronchodilator medications or most likely any time you feel as if you’re are having a problem with mucus or congestion.

With that, we always like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS, and today we ask, “Have you heard of and used the controlled cough techniques and if you have, did you find the process helpful?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Beta-2 Agonist’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Beta-2 Agonist’.

What is ‘Beta-2 Agonist’?

A very basic definition would be – a medication that relaxes and widens the airways, making breathing easier.

Beta-2 agonists are a type of bronchodilator, which means they were developed to help make breathing easier and are normally available in metered-dose inhalers, dry powder inhalers, a nebulizer, pill, injected, and in syrup forms.

Many ‘beta-2 agonists may be available in multiple forms and it will be your physician or pulmonologist who will help you decide which form works best for you and the level of your COPD and/or severe Asthma.

There will be two types of ‘beta-2 agonists’ to work with – one being short-acting and one being long-acting.

The short-acting type of ‘beta-2 agonists’ relieves symptoms and the long-acting form will help prevent further breathing problems.

Short-acting ‘beta-2 agonists’ will commonly be used for treating stable COPD with a patient whose symptoms come and go, intermittent symptoms.  The long-acting ‘beta-2 agonists’ are more effective and convenient for preventing and treating COPD in a person whose symptoms do not go away, persistent symptoms.

According to several medical reports, ‘beta-2 agonists’ are effective in treating symptoms of COPD and improving lung functions as measured by spirometry tests.  Reports also claim ‘beta-2 agonists’ can reduce the number of COPD exacerbations.

While all medicines have side effects, the most common side effects found from using ‘beta-2 agonists’ are headaches, anxiety, nausea, muscle tremors, nervousness and a possible increased or irregular heartbeat (palpitations).

According to reports, a couple of things can be pointed out about the possible side effects – one, they are more likely to occur when you take the medicine as a pill or injection, and two, side effects may appear to go away after you take the ‘beta-2 agonists’ for a while.

You should always remember to discuss with your pharmacist about the possible side effects of each medicine you take, and be sure to read any materials that come with the medicines you are prescribed.

With that, we always like to ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS, and today we ask, “Do you take any ‘beta-2 agonists’ as part of your routine of efforts to control the progress and affects from your battle with COPD and/or severe Asthma?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Airway Hyperactivity’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Airway Hyperactivity’.

What is ‘Airway Hyperactivity’?

When looked up, the term ‘airway hyperactivity’ is said to be increased airway sensitivity maybe due to various etiological factors or the key feature of asthma characterized by an exaggerated constriction of the airways to irritants.

Those irritants which someone with COPD and/or severe Asthma may find to be a major problem, may be nothing but normal to most folks.  When you may have this condition of ‘airway hyperactivity’ you may develop a persistent cough.

‘Airway hyperactivity’ can be caused by a wide range of diseases including Anaphylaxis, Autoimmune Disorder, C1 esterase Inhibitor Deficiency, Chronic Urticaria, Hereditary Angioedema, Leukemia, Thyroid Autoimmunity.

‘Airway hyperactivity’ can also be caused by irritations from such items as ACE inhibitors, Animal Dander, Antivenom Preparation, Aspirin, Chemotherapy Agents, Chocolates, Cold Weather, a Dental Procedure, Drug Allergy, Emotional stress, Exposure to Sunlight, Food Additives, Fresh Berries, Milk, Opiates, Peanuts, Penicillin, Post Infection, Preservatives, Radiocontrast Agents, Shellfish, Snake Bites, Sulfonamides, Tomatoes and a Tonsillectomy.

Many times, physicians who use the term ‘airway hyperactivity’ do not have or have not scheduled a pulmonary function test for the patient who is showing signs of the situation.

With that, we ask a QUESTION OF OUR READERS and today we ask, “Were you ever told you had ‘airway hyperactivity and if so why and what was the major irritant in your case?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Wheezing’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Wheezing’.

What is ‘Wheezing’?

By its definition, ‘wheezing’ is “breathing with a rasp or whistling sound as a result from constriction or obstruction of the throat, pharynx, trachea or bronchi”.

Wheezing will occur when a person is trying to breathe deeply through air passages that are narrowed or filled with mucus, normally found as result of an allergy, infection, illness or irritation.

It is most commonly found when exhaling and will at times be accompanied by a mild sensation of tightness in the chest, while anxiety brought on by not being able to breathe can easily cause muscle tension that will the matter of breathing worse.

Wheezing is most commonly found as a symptom associated with asthma and can be caused by a variety of things such as exposure to allergens from food, pollen and other substances sometimes unique to each individual asthmatic.  Other causes may come from fumes, ice-cold drinks, very cold air, medication, strenuous exercise, weather changes, foreign objects trapped in the airways, cystic fibrosis and other genetic disorders.  Wheezing will also be found with such respiratory illnesses as pneumonia, bronchitis, congestive heart failure, emphysema and COPD.

Normally a diagnosis of wheezing comes when a physician, allergist or pulmonologist takes a medical history and then performs skin and blood tests to identify the precise nature of the problem.

Many times, a pulmonary function test may be ordered to measure the amount of air moving through a patient’s breathing passages and x-rays will sometimes be used to indicate wheezing caused by chronic bronchitis or emphysema.

In a case of mild wheezing, it may be relieved by drinking plenty of juice, water, weak tea and broth, while ice-cold drinks should be avoided.  Many medical folks will have a patient with a wheezing problem, use a vaporizer or maybe a steam tent.

Bronchodilators (the meds used to widen narrowed airways) will many times be prescribed for patients whose wheezing is caused by asthma.  Newer asthma medications taken daily can help prevent asthma attacks, as can avoiding the triggers that can set off allergies and asthma.

When wheezing is caused by an allergic reaction, physicians will give antihistamines to neutralize body chemicals that may be reacting to the allergen.

Other possible relief avenues from wheezing can be found in some yoga positions as they improve breathing control and reduce stress.

Those with emphysema, COPD and asthma know that wheezing and breathing problems can be life-threatening and those people and the people that travel within their world should know the symptoms to look for when fearing an emergency attack of wheezing.  Among those symptoms would be a person turning blue or gray while fighting for a quality breath, the person becomes unable to speak, starts coughing up bubbly-pink or white phlegm, develops a fever over 101, and starts to constantly wheeze all the time.

With that, we ask a ‘QUESTION OF OUR READERS’ and today we ask, “How often do you, while fighting COPD and/or Asthma, develop wheezing problems and how long do they normally last?”

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Vital Capacity’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word(s) ‘Vital Capacity’.

What is ‘Vital Capacity’?

By definition, ‘Vital Capacity’ is “the greatest amount of air that can be forced from the lungs after maximum inhalation”.  It is the maximum amount of air you expel from your lungs after you have a maximum inhalation and it is equal to the sum of inspiratory reserve volume, tidal volume and expiratory reserve volume.

A person’s vital capacity is measured with a wet or regular spirometer and in combination with other physiological measurments, can help give that person a diagnosis of any lung disease.

‘Vital Capacity’ is also used to in helping determine the severity of respiratory muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases and can help physicians and specialists be guided when making treatment decisions in Guillian-Barre` Syndrome and mayasthenic crisis.

Whereas a normal adult should have a vital capacity between three and five litres, the reading can and will depend on age, sex, height, mass and ethnicity.

Most of anyone that has been diagnosed with either severe Asthma or any stage of COPD has been given tests to see where that person’s lungs are within the scope of their disease.

While both lung volumes and lung capacities will refer to the volume of air associated with different phases of a respiratory cyle, the lung volume is directly measured while the lung capacity is inferred from those volumes.

Most of anyone diagnosed with COPD and/or severe Asthma knows the importance of knowing their FEV (forced expiratory volume) measures – which is how much air a person can exhale during a forced breath.  Those are measured during the first (FEV1), second (FEV2) and third (FEV3) seconds of the forced breath.

Your forced ‘Vital Capacity’ (FVC) is the total amount of air exhaled during the FEV testing.

Just remember, while FEV numbers seem to be the most often referenced, it is important to know your overall FVC or ‘Vital Capacity’ number as well in helping you keep track of the depth of your battle with COPD and/or Asthma.

With that, we ask a ‘QUESTION OF OUR READERS’ and today we ask, “Do you know your FVC (‘Vital Capacity’) number and how it relates to your FEV (Forced Expiratory Volume) numbers?

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)