Living-4-Today – – When We Do Not Understand

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Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your day as I have within mine….

The Word – “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways…”  (Isaiah 55:8, NIV)

The Thought – How many question the why or how that they may have become equipped with a chronic illness or disability?

I’m sure that we all have crossed that bump somewhere along our travels, the question is whether we pursue it or just let it go while we concentrate on the moment and the future.

While many of us may now understand the why as to getting our chronic illness or disability, the reason is the one that I would guess slips away from most.

Unless you had been doing something obvious, like smoking, coming down with something like COPD or severe asthma can raise questions as to just what the heck happened to put us on this new path of travel for life.

These are the times when we need to take time to relax and grab some extra moments of meditation and/or prayer, and have some deep conversations with the one friend we can always count on – the ‘Great Spirits’.

When we do not understand the reason or why for something, it can be made into a very stressful situation as we search for those answers, when there really is nothing we can do about it.

What’s done, is done, and for most of us there is nothing we can do about it except to move forward, don’t dwell on the past and search for the best path available for our future.

In times of meditation and/or prayer, we need to continue to seek the wisdom of what and where we go from this point forward without dwelling on those travels we already made, while knowing that if the reasons as to why and how we got to this point is needed for the trip forward – then know the ‘Great Spirits’ will eventually show us the answers.

Do not worry about most of what we do not understand, because life is sometimes like your computer or smart phone – if something goes wrong, turn it off, wait patiently, restart and move forward, as most likely all will be well once again.

Concentrate on those four fundamentals of life and happiness – hope, faith, love and grace.  Even while seeking guidance and wisdom in living along those fundamentals, we have times when we get impatient with the ‘Great Spirits’ when the answers we are looking for don’t come in the time frame we want them to.

So, it is in those moments that we will not always understand and that is just the way life works. So, relax and seek to make sure that the moment you may be in now is the best and strongest it can be so you can be prepared for the next unexpected bump in the road of life that your chronic illness or disability may throw at you.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we take these moments to seek in quiet, the ‘Great Spirits’, may we give first the gratefulness for all the world that surrounds the path we are on as we step up and ask you ‘Great Spirits’ to guide us forward with no questions asked.   We trust in the moments that we have been given for today and with your spirit we look to work on that which we can control in tomorrow, while properly leaving yesterday laid out at the feet of you ‘Great Spirits’, until that moment may come for which we need to reach back to gander at the yesterday gone past that will help the situation we may be in now.  ‘Great Spirits’ we thank you for the opportunity to continue to seek the four fundamentals of life and happiness, those being hope, faith, love and grace.

And we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – COPD/Asthma and the Weather – Part 1

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It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a new weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

With the weather recently having trouble trying to figure out if it still had some winter to throw at folks before spring totally settles in, it seems logical to touch base with the effects of COPD/Asthma from what is happening with the weather.

So, let’s see just what possible effects that you should be watching for when the weather may be getting ready to change or may be settling in for a lengthy period of being either hot or cold and/or dry or humid.

Special Note – This writer, who has been a severe asthmatic since early childhood, remembers his mother referring to him as her human barometer because when the weather was getting ready to change, she would know just by the changes in my breathing or lung stamina.  So, for nearly a lifetime, this writer has dealt with the weather and the games it plays on my lungs and breathing.

With that I encourage you to stay alert, because this is just part one, of two parts, from a lengthy article which I put together from a posting on a medical internet site for which I forgot to write the name down of when I copied to share the article itself.

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The Connection Between COPD and Weather – Part 1

How the Weather Impacts COPD Symptoms –

When seasons change or some front moves in, COPD patients are often the first to notice. Living with compromised airways makes you more sensitive to particles in the air, as well moisture content, air pressure, and temperature.

A big fluctuation can bring on a COPD exacerbation, but even relatively mild changes can lead to shortness of breath, increase in mucus, and a general feeling of discomfort from head to toe.

You may not be able to control the weather, but you can limit its unpleasant effects with a few careful adjustments. The first step is understanding your individual weather sensitivities, and how they link to common COPD triggers.

The Strain of Hot and Cold –

When temperatures swing to either side of the thermometer, your respiratory system must work harder to pull in extra oxygen to keep your body at a healthy temperature. COPD causes airways and lungs to react more drastically to changes in air pressure and composition:

Extremes lead to exacerbations. Some patients are more sensitive to temperature extremes than others, but experts insist that anything below freezing or above 90 degrees are bad for anyone living with COPD. Frigid temperatures tend to fatigue those with a chronic lung condition, wind can worsen COPD symptoms, and heat can cause your airways to inflame and constrict (which leads to bronchospasm).

Barometric pressure. Not surprisingly, the weight of the atmosphere can have a fairly big impact on lung comfort. Barometric pressure is a way to calculate how heavy the air feels – that is, how much moisture is suspended in the air. Warm air holds more moisture than cold air, which means water molecules take up more space, leaving less room for oxygen molecules. So, on days with high barometric pressure, you will take in less oxygen which each breath.

How Lungs React to Moisture and Humidity –

COPD reactions, like asthma attacks, are notoriously difficult to predict. Some find humid days more comfortable, while others breathe easier in warm, dry air, and although you could fall on either side of this equation, experts believe that minimal humidity is best for COPD patients. In the end, you should aim for a 40% humidity level (both inside and outside of your home), which will limit some common triggers, like:

Mold > The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that those with COPD are more sensitive to mold, and humid air is the perfect breeding ground. Mold exposure can irritate the throat and lungs, lead to more wheezing and congestion, and worsen asthma symptoms.

Dust mites > When humidity levels climb above 50%, dust mite populations grow. Most people with chronic lung disease will agree that dust is high on the list of triggers, so it’s important to do what you can to limit the buildup.

Exertion > Humid air has a high-water content, which makes it denser, and harder to work. In very humid environments, every breath can become a conscious effort, as the lungs continue to resist airflow and act of inhaling continues to sap your energy.

Keeping humidity down is not as easy as you might imagine. Heating and cooling systems kick into gear when seasons change, and it can be difficult to detect relative humidity just by feeling alone. A humidity monitor is a great tool for COPD patients, and a simple addition to your home air management plan.

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‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Scheduling Times Ahead

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‘Lenny’ is my constant companion the doctors call COPD/Asthma.  Naming my constant health companion seems to make life easier for me in relating to my disease as it gives it a bit of a personality.  Besides treating ‘Lenny’ as a companion, come good days or bad, is much better than always dealing with it as an enemy.

Let’s see where ‘Lenny’ and Me have been most recently – we are looking ahead.

Scheduling times ahead, just what do I mean by that.  It means work harder at planning ahead with projects and events so not to antagonize ‘Lenny’ my companion known as COPD/Asthma.

Because of my chronic illness/disease, I can and will get tired quicker than most folks which means I must assemble a plan when I know there may something I need to attend to.  Even running to the store is something I must take a few moments to prepare for.

When we talk prepare, for the little trips around town for a run to the store, attending a meeting or playing taxi for the grandkids – I still prepare by making sure I have my rescue inhaler with me, take several concentrated breathes to see how my breathing may be for the day, check to make sure I am dressed properly so not to get to hot or too cold and always double check to make sure my mind is in the right mode to be paying attention to my surroundings.

The last step of preparation is possible the most important as those of us with a chronic illness and/or disability know, that keeping our head, eyes and mind on a swivel is important when out and about because we are always either consciously or sub-consciously checking for triggers, so that ‘Lenny’ will not get irritated and set out to upset our being out and about.

I am thinking about these preparation things because around here we are heading into the final four weeks of school and in my case the final five weeks before my daughter and four grandkids move out of state, some five-plus hours away by car.

We sat down the other day to check what is left on the school schedules for grandkid stuff and found that there would be nine events in the days between today and May 25 which this grandparent knows he wants to share in with the grandkids.  And that is not counting six required meetings, a couple of funerals, a couple of family nights and at least three events that I was hoping to attend to help rekindle my photography.

With each of these events, I must remember to think ahead not only for myself but for ‘Lenny’, thinking of what I may need in case of a spout of trouble when “Lenny’ finds a trigger.

Of course, with the grandkids that are moving, the one thing I will not be able to plan-ahead for will be the emotional strain and drain, as these four grandkids are extremely close to this ‘Papa’ and I know I will miss them a bunch when they move.  And for those who may deal with a chronic illness or disability, especially one that involves the lungs, the level of one’s emotions can even play on how we are feeling and doing.

As I realize how busy a couple of weeks have become, I stop and contemplate just what and if I should or could work even one more event in the month without really pushing the line on keep up my stamina and ability to stay one step ahead of ‘Lenny’ and its habit of being unpredictable.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

Follow all the adventures of “‘Lenny’ and Me 4 Today” at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at “COPD Travels”.

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Living – 4 – Today – – Born to Change, Again

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Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your day as I have within mine….

The Word – “” How can a man be born when he is old,” Nicodemus asked.  “Surely he cannot enter a second time into his mother’s womb to be born……Flesh gives birth to flesh, but the Spirit, gives birth to spirit.”” (John 3:4,6; NIV)

The Thought – Previously we discussed ‘regenerating’ our lives and so we discuss it again because it holds much importance in our lives, the lives we now live tied to the companion we call a chronic illness or disability.

So many when they get into a situation of major change, can just recoil and carry on as if they have been defeated by the change, by the new companionship of a life we did not bargain for or expect.

But life is life and no matter how much we think we can direct our future, whether it be a few years, a few months, a few weeks, a few hours or even just a few minutes ahead of where we are – we cannot direct it with any certainty.

What we do know as fact is that yesterday was yesterday and is now gone, behind us with nothing more than memories and evaluation, while today is today and we can only help determine the moments we are in.

This is where those of us that travel a path of life with the companionship of chronic illness or disability, find us not any different than those who battle drug or alcohol addictions in that only we and our work with our own belief in the ‘Great Spirits’ can make the changes necessary to be able to enjoy, appreciate and prosper in the moments that we have.

Throughout life most of us don’t even realize the number of times we have had to change our path, our conception of the good and bad of the day we are in.  When we went from toddler to child – we changed.  When we went from child to young adult (or as some call it – the terrible teens) – we changed.  When we went from young adult to adulthood – we changed.

All those changes came as the path we traveled was adjusted to account for new routines, new expectations and new responsibilities – we were in many ways, born again each time.

As the reality of having to accept the constant new companionship of a chronic illness or disability came upon us, we must remember that while many others may have slipped away from their responsibility of standing by us as family or friends – we will always have the presence of the ‘Great Spirits’ and the constant role of friend, mentor and spiritual leader they supply as we make the adjustments needed.

So, let us lean on our daily time with the ‘Great Spirits’ and soak in those quiet times of their companionship to seek and find the wisdom and appreciation of the positives to being born again under the role of companionship with our chronic illness and/or disability, while continuing to seek to solidify our four fundamentals of happiness and life – hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we take this quiet time with you, ‘Great Spirits’, we seek your mentoring and moments of wisdom to help us be born once again along this path of life for which we travel.  As we say thank you for all the wonders that you surround us with, may we also say thank you for the many times your guidance and wisdom has helped pull us through our various rebirth’s in life.  May we, with your help, complete the work needed with attitudes, perception and expectations to be reborn once again to the wonders ahead with the companionship of a chronic illness and/or disability.  And may we realize that despite the changes being made, that all will be well if we count on holding on to the four fundamentals of happiness and life – those being hope, faith, love and grace.

And we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – #4 of the ‘5 Myths of COPD’

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As a writer, I find it important to share what I learn with others so that they also may gain knowledge needed to have more secure footing when they battle their own illness or chronic disease.

Taking my responsibility for learning as much as I can about my COPD/Asthma is something I choose to do so to make myself more aware of what is happening now, what may happen at any moment and what may lay ahead as I travel my path of life with the companionship of COPD/Asthma.

With all that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help remind people, both those affected by the disease and those family and friends that surround them, of the ideas, research, diagnoses, game-plans and all that goes with keeping the battles at a distance.

Today we discuss or refresh your knowledge of part four of a five-part series on the ‘5 Myths of COPD/Asthma that can make you sicker’ if you let them.

COPD Myth #4: “People with COPD can’t exercise.”

When a person has problems with their breathing the last thing they seem to think about doing is exercising.

Many people with COPD seem to be afraid of exercising over the fear that it may be unsafe and will make it even more difficult to breathe.  The fact about that attitude is that it is wrong for the simple reason that exercising keeps your lungs and body energized while also helping build and/or keep up your stamina.

They say that even a little routine of exercise, one that gets your heart a pumping and your breathing labored without setting off another wheezing or exacerbation attack.

Many will also say that exercise will help decrease a person’s chances of catching infections and illnesses.  And as we all know that any time somebody with COPD/Asthma gets an infection or illness, the risk rises of ending up in the hospital.

Exercise does not drain a person’s energy, but instead should increase the energy a person will have and help keep the person from hitting as many spots in the day where they feel drained.

One thing a person with COPD/Asthma should do is consult with their physician, pulmonologist and/or a pulmonary rehabilitation tech about the appropriate exercises and breathing techniques that will enable a person to maintain exercising at a level that will be successful in helping lessen those times of being short of breath.

QUESTIONS OF REFLECTION – – For those fighting the battle with COPD/Asthma – what exercise routine or program seems to work best for you so that you get the workout without causing a problem with your breathing?  Is your exercise routine one that was recommended and setup by your medical care folks or is it a routine that you put together?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, CrossDove Writer reminds you that if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > a person without breathing is a person without life itself.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various news/health websites, COPD Foundation’s “Big Fat Reference Guide on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease” and the book “Live Your Life with COPD”)

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Living Today – – Regenerating You

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Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your day as I have within mine….

The Word – “Strength arising out of complete defeat and weakness, the loss of one’s old life as a condition for finding a new one.”  (Twelve-Steps and Twelve Traditions, page 46)

The Thought – When your life takes a turn and the normal routine gets turned upside down due to a chronic illness or disability, our life and the road we may be traveling changes.

How it changes depends on the person and how well prepared they may be mentally, physically and spiritually.  How well were you prepared when you may have become ill enough with your chronic illness or disability that what was routine was not routine anymore.

As we cross the line from what was to what will be due to our chronic illness or disability, we are forced to regenerate ourselves to fit the new situation or adventure we have been handed.

Normally, to get through this change, one of the steps we will have to make is to admit defeat to a certain extent.  Accepting defeat is hard no matter what the situation may be, but to accept defeat when coming to grips with the fact that our chronic illness or disability will now keep us from possible doing or living the way we had been doing or living, that is just plain a tough hurdle to jump.  But to accept the defeat and work at putting it behind us is the only way to regenerate into the new routine of a new travel of life that we must make.

If you are not comfortable with admitting the defeat to anyone physically, then take your visiting time with the ‘Great Spirits’ to get entire situation off your chest, sort of speak.  Talk with the ‘Great Spirits’ and throw it all on the table, both the good and the bad that you may see in the upcoming change.  Listen and feel the response, be ready to find yourself saying thank you for the changes, even when and if you may not feel so at first.

Our chronic illness or disability puts us in a position, to regenerate our lives, removing from our travels the way we were, the way we were living, the way we were surviving.  It is time to take on the challenge of renewing our lives to travel forward while working within the new parameters of our chronic illness or disability, and with the help of the ‘Great Spirits’ we can do so as we continue our travels while working within the goals of doing so using the four fundamentals of life happiness – hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer – ‘Great Spirits’ we have been given a major bump in our road of life, a bump that means we have to change our routine.  While we always thank you for the world you have surrounded us with during these travels, we also say thank you for being there for us as we seem to be starting over or regenerating ourselves to fit what our chronic illness or disability will allow us to do.  ‘Great Spirit’ we look to you for the guidance and wisdom to keep us moving forward and working with our situation to make the adjustments in our travels to still work at having the four fundamentals of life within our daily life so that regenerating ourselves and our lives can be done while still holding tight to hope, faith, love and grace.

And we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Exacerbations’

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When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With all that in mind, let’s discuss the word ‘Exacerbations’.

‘Exacerbations’ is a reference to an increase (many times sudden) in the severity of symptoms, including an increase with a person’s difficulty in breathing.  Depending on the severity, some acute ‘exacerbations’ may require a visit to the doctor or in some cases the hospital.

For someone with asthma, ‘exacerbations’ would mean you are having a sudden attack which is most likely being caused by a personal trigger such as exercise, cold air and/or allergens such as pet dander or pollen.  For those with asthma, more often than not, when the trigger or triggers are removed the opportunity for the symptoms to clear up increase substantanially and the person will start returning to feeling normal.

Now if you are someone with COPD, then ‘exacerbations’ will most likely kick in when caused by common trigger such as a respiratory infection like from a cold or the flu.  In some circumstances an ‘exacerbation’ trigger from secondhand smoke and/or high humidity will make your COPD symptoms much worse.

The big difference if you have COPD and not Asthma is that with COPD – when you remove the respiratory infection and/or ‘exacerbation’ trigger that alone will not make the symptoms of COPD go away as they would with Asthma.

ONE THING TO REMEMBER is that it’s possible to have both Asthma and COPD, which could make the symptoms of both diseases worse and in many ways harder to control.

In your own individual battle with COPD and/or Asthma, be sure to learn and understand the words of importance in understanding what is going on within these battles and today that word to know and understand is ‘Exacerbations’.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Remember always that without breathing a person is without life itself.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Image used cleared for use by yahoo.com and/or google.images.com)

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)