Living-4-Today – – Unhindered Time

Standard

Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your daily battles with a chronic illness and/or disability as I have within mine….

The Word – “Time passes unhindered. When we make mistakes, we cannot turn the clock back and try again. All we can do is use the present well.” – Dalai Lama

The Thought – One thing we all realize, especially as we begin to fly through those later years, is that time does not stop for anyone or anything.  Time just seems to always be in a mode of cruise and keeps rolling forward unhindered no matter what I do or don’t do.

As with many of us that are fighting a chronic illness, we have had times where we would look back and make the effort to dissect those things that we determined as being mistakes in choices along our path of life and in some of those instances have even tried to turn the clock back and change the outcome.  Guess what – it doesn’t work that way.

Time marches on unhindered, unwilling to give us those chances to fix the wrongs, change the mistakes or undo the harm or outcome of bad choices, and this is especially true with health issues because when you get to that point where your health becomes a chronic problem there is no turning back the clock of time.

The best we can do is realize what those past mistakes make great learning lessons and those lessons should be used to make our present-day situations more livable.

Those who spend time each day with the ‘Great Spirits’ in quiet meditation and/or prayer, most likely have that unique relationship with the ‘Great Spirits’ that give us the opportunity to unload our past mistakes, sometimes many times over, while looking for the guidance to make better use of our today.

When we realize that time moves forward unhindered from anything we may do, we learn to work with our time to make the best of what is available and with that perception we can then work at the four fundamentals of life and happiness – finding hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer – As we step into silent time of meditation and/or prayer, we call upon the ‘Great Spirits’ with much gratitude for all that surrounds us in our current moments of walks in life itself and say thank you for being so forgiving in all our mistakes made in the walk up to this moment in time.  We ask the ‘Great Spirits’ to give us the guidance and wisdom to make the four fundamentals of life and happiness – hope, faith, love and grace – the focus of our battles not only with our chronic illness, but also the battle we face of time moving forward so fast and so unhindered.

With that we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – ‘Nutrition’, Part 7 is ‘Sodium & Potassium’

Standard

When I began my travels and battles with COPD/Asthma I knew that it was important to learn what and when I could to better understand as much about COPD and Asthma so I would always be up to date as to what I was up against.

I also felt that as a member of the COPD/Asthma nation, it was important to continually share information that may possible help even one other person in their own battles with COPD/Asthma.

With that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help both inform and refresh the knowledge of all that goes with battling COPD and/or Asthma.

Today we discuss or refresh your knowledge about ‘Sodium & Potassium’ with the seventh of a ten-part series on ‘Nutrition’.

‘Nutrition’ is vitally important for any person with COPD as having a proper diet will go a long way in protecting the lung function needed for breathing.

Dealing with Sodium and Potassium – –

}} Try to consume less than 1 teaspoon or 2,300 mg of sodium per day.

}} Make your diet salt-less except what is already in most processed foods.

}} Prepare foods with little salt and choose to eat potassium-rich foods which would include fruits and vegetables.  Consider finding alternatives for salt in recipes, such as using seasonings from the Mrs. Dash collection.

}} Remember that salt found in salt shakers is made up of sodium and chloride.

}} Remember that excess salt can even make it more difficult to have an efficient kidney.

}} Watching sodium intake daily is vitally important especially if you have problems beyond just your lungs like high blood pressure, heart problems or are taking any kind of steroids.

‘COPD Travels’ will continue talking nutrition beyond the diet/meal itself with upcoming discussions on areas involving food safety and physical conditioning.

REFLECTION QUESTION – Do you have any special methods to help watch the amount of sodium and potassium within your diet?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)

Notes to Know About COPD/Asthma – Insight into ‘Breo Ellipta’, part 1

Standard

It is always important to know what is going on in the world of COPD/Asthma, hence a weekly (at the minimum) posting of ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ – because those of us battling the issue should always be up to date on what is going on, and that includes both the positives and the negatives of the COPD/Asthma life.

Today we are sharing a compilation of information found in postings found on the internet regarding the COPD/Asthma medicine ‘Breo Ellipta’.

Special Note – This writer takes Breo Ellipta and found many insights to the medicine that we were not aware of when our physician/pulmonologist prescribed it for our daily routine in our own battle with COPD and/or Asthma.

So – here is part one, of a two-part series giving you an ‘Insight to ‘Breo Ellipta’.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

BREO ELLIPTA

What is Breo Ellipta – it is an inhalation powder that contains a combination of fluticasone and vilanterol.  Fluticasone is a steroid that prevents the release of substances in the body that causes inflammation, while Vilanterol is a bronchodilator that works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing.

Breo Ellipta is a once-daily combination medicine used with adults who suffer with asthma and/or COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), to improve symptoms and prevent bronchospasm or asthma attacks.

In people with COPD, Breo Ellipta is used for long-term treatment, while people with asthma use Breo Ellipta as a short-term treatment until symptoms are well-controlled with other medicines.

It is recommended that you should not use Breo Ellipta if you are allergic to fluticasone, vilanterol or milk proteins.

BEFORE TAKING THIS MEDICINE:

Understand that Breo Ellipta is NOT a rescue medicine as it will not work fast enough to treat an asthma or bronchospasm attack.  When having an asthma attack you should only use a fast acting inhalation medicine.

Be sure to inform your physician and/or pulmonologist if you have any of the following:

> a weak immune system

> heart disease or high blood pressure

> live disease

> glaucoma or cataracts

> a thyroid disorder

> seizures

> diabetes

> any type of infection including tuberculosis or a herpes infection of the eye

> a personal or family history of osteoporosis

> pregnant or plan to become pregnant

A person should also understand that Fluticasone can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection or worsening an infection you may already have or recently had.

Also know that while Vilanterol may increase the risk of death in people with asthma, the risk in people with COPD is not yet known.

If you feel your asthma/COPD medications are not working the way you expected, then tell your physician and/or pulmonologist.

HOW SHOULD YOU USE BREO ELLIPTA:

Breo Ellipta is a powder that comes with a special inhaler device preloaded with blister packs containing a measured dose of the medicine.  The device opens and loads a blister of Fluticasone and Vilanterol each time a person will use the inhaler.  The disk device is not to be used with a spacer and to reduce the chance of developing a yeast infection in your mouth, a person should always rinse with water after using your inhaler – but do not swallow the water, rinse and release.

You should always use Breo Ellipta exactly as prescribed by your doctor and listen to your doctor if they may occasionally change your dose to get better results.

Never use Breo Ellipta in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

The normal dose of Breo Ellipta is one inhalation per day and it is recommended that a person uses the medicine at the same time each day and not more than once in a 24-hour period.

In part two we will discuss among things, the possible side effects of using Breo Ellipta.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ will continue to feature writings from medical folks and caretakers who share insights into the world of what may be going on in the world of COPD/Asthma.  ‘Notes to Know about COPD/Asthma’ can be found at either wheezingaway.com or within the Facebook page, COPD Travels.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Living-4-Today – – Perception

Standard

Sharing with others daily words, thoughts and meditations that bring myself hope and renewal during my own daily battles and frustrations with COPD/Asthma.  Sharing, because as we all know – without that horizon of hope, our daily renewal of faith and fight can dim in a hurry.

Take, read, meditate and hopefully find some of the same hope in your daily battles with a chronic illness and/or disability as I have within mine….

The Word – “If only you would be altogether silent.  For you, that would-be wisdom.”  (Job 13:5, NIV)

The Thought – When people begin a relationship they should reflect together in silence on the wisdom that Herb Vander Lugt once wrote, “Deep relationships are built on acceptance, understanding, and listening.”

One of the biggest problems in relationships, especially those where you are blending two families together is acceptance of what all is already present, understanding what all is already present and listening to what all is already present.

Several years ago, a couple I know married, the second marriage for both, a marriage that combined two families and four kids, two each for each spouse.  From there a couple of things would happen, either both the kids are all accepted by the families of both spouses or they are not – and a lot of that acceptance may come down to perception.

One of the ‘Great Spirits’ greatest gifts is that of grandchildren and the love bonds that develop between them and the grandparents they are given at birth.  Most folks that are or have been grandparents of little ones know the absolute joy that comes from building that bond of security and love between them and sometimes the perception of that bond can and will be misperceived.

Without knowing it, a child feels the work of hope, faith, love and grace that comes from the ‘Great Spirits’ and a relationship with a grandparent, many times to the point where the grandchild will express that appreciation before the grandparent has a chance to convey it and the parents have a chance to understand it.

The signs of this relationship between grandchild and grandparent can sometimes be misperceived as favoritism, especially to those bringing new grandkids into a blended family environment.

Another sign of misperception can come when someone in the either family becomes ill and needs special acceptance for such an illness, especially when the illness is like COPD and/or Asthma and the signs of it sometimes are very unpredictable.  Can the blended family both accept the illness and the necessary time one of them may need to devout in helping the family member with such an illness, or will they misperceive that need as favoring one family over the other.

When it comes to additional grandkids thrown into the fray of grandparenting, I know most grandparents open the new additions to the flock with very open, loving arms, while leaning on the ‘Great Spirits’ to continue giving them guidance and wisdom on how to heal any hurts the new grandkids may have coming into new, sometimes confusing blended family experience.

This is those times when both the parents of the blended family and the grandparents working at blending equally all grandkids, need to rely on sitting in silence with the ‘Great Spirits’ and finding the guidance and wisdom of understanding how quickly perception and misperception can unglue the four fundamentals of blended family happiness – those of hope, faith, love and grace.

The Meditation/Prayer –  As we take a moment to rest in meditation, we look toward the ‘Great Spirits’ with much gratitude for all that surrounds us in the walk we call life.  We also ask the ‘Great Spirits’ for continued wisdom and guidance to breaking down the walls of misperception that can tear apart families that find love but struggle with blending their families together despite that love.  May our times of silence with the ‘Great Spirits’ give us time to strengthen our work within the four fundamentals of life and happiness – as hope, faith, love and grace all will be needed to overcome that great barrier of misperception.

With that we all say Hallelujah, Amen.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – This writing may not be reused in any manner without written permission.)

(More ‘Living 4 Today’ writings can be found at either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.)

Words of COPD/Asthma – ‘Orthopnea’

Standard

When you have a disability or chronic illness, one of the most important things you can do is to learn as much as you can about it.  The more you know, the easier it should be to get a handle on those days when you feel like it is a constant battle and you are not sure you are winning.

Knowing the language or words that go with COPD/Asthma is a great way to start or to continue to refresh a person’s knowledge of the ins and outs of the lifelong health companion which we are dealing with.

With that, we discuss some of what we call ‘must know words’ of life with COPD/Asthma – and today we will discuss briefly the importance of knowing the word ‘Orthopnea’.

Orthopnea’ is used in describing difficulty breathing because of your body position, especially when the SoB (Short of Breath) happens when lying or sleeping while on your back.  A person having this difficulty is likely to use several pillows just to be able to breathe better when resting or sleeping.

This kind of disorder can be and should be considered very dangerous and if left untreated can possible cause death while the patient sleeps.

COPD and Asthma patients are commonly found with this sleeping disorder and need to work with it while battling their own individual battle with COPD/Asthma.

Orthopnea’ must be taken seriously as it is not only a sign of lungs being congested but also could be giving your warning signals that your heart is not functioning properly.  When you lay flat the blood that is in your feet and legs become evenly distributed to your entire body which if you’re healthy is no big deal as the lungs and heart can handle it, but if you’re not healthy it will cause problems with the heart and your lungs will not be able to handle the extra fluids and weight.

To know if your sleeping difficulties are ‘Orthopnea’ a person needs to look for some of the more common signs and symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’ such shortness of breath while lying flat, swollen feet and/or ankles, need of pillows when sleeping and/or laying down and coughing on a regular basis while laying down.  Medical folks also say being overweight can also cause ‘Orthopnea’.

Personal Note – This writer, while having been diagnosed with sleep apnea, is familiar with the symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’ because I have fought that difficulty since I was a little kid.  Always needing extra pillows and never sleep flat on my back because it would cause a problem for my breathing or asthma and in more recent times with my COPD.

If adjusting your head and/or body’s height so that sleep may remedy ‘Orthopnea’ for a while, but if the difficulty of sleeping continues then you must consult your physician.

With all that, we ask you the readers if you have symptoms of ‘Orthopnea’, how or have you found solutions?  As always, we look forward to hearing your input – thanx.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer, reprinting or reuse of this article is restricted without written permission.)

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

Know that you can follow all the writings by CrossDove Writer pertaining to COPD/Asthma by following at wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information gathered from various books and internet sources discussing COPD, Asthma and other lung diseases)

Reflections of COPD/Asthma – ‘Nutrition’, Part 6 is ‘Carbs’

Standard

When I began my travels and battles with COPD/Asthma I knew that it was important to learn what and when I could to better understand as much about COPD and Asthma so I would always be up to date as to what I was up against.

I also felt that as a member of the COPD/Asthma nation, it was important to continually share information that may possible help even one other person in their own battles with COPD/Asthma.

With that, ‘Reflections of COPD/Asthma’ will cover a variety of topics to help both inform and refresh the knowledge of all that goes with battling COPD and/or Asthma.

Today we discuss or refresh your knowledge about ‘Carbs’ with the sixth of a ten-part series on ‘Nutrition’.

‘Nutrition’ is vitally important for any person with COPD as having a proper diet will go a long way in protecting the lung function needed for breathing.

Deal with carbohydrates with some of these key ideas –

}} Choosing fiber-rich vegetables with nearly every meal.

}} Choosing fiber-rich fruits with every meal.

}} Choosing fiber-rich grains often.

}} Prepare foods by choosing ingredients and beverages with little added sugar or sweetners.

}} Always consider guided amounts from the USDA Food Guide.

}} Try following “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension” or what is called the DASH eating plan.

}} Seldom eat and/or drink foods and beverages which contain sugar and starch.

We will continue the CrossDove Writer’s series on Nutrition in future postings as we always need to have as much information as possible to fight our own individual battles with our own COPD.

Remember that most diets/nutritional ideas will work depending on what an individual’s nutritional and physical needs may be.

REFLECTION QUESTION – What do you do to control the carbs that you take in when eating?

If you would like to reflect your response to others, please leave them under the comment section of wheezingaway.com.  Thanx.

As always, if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

ALWAYS REMEMBER > A person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

NOTE TO REMEMBER: We only give descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer and more medical founded information.

With that I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer – reprint or use by written permission only.)

To follow more postings written by Mr. William, feel free to check out either wheezingaway.com or on Facebook at COPD Travels.

(Information used is gathered from a various number of books, magazines and websites followed and read by Mr. William.)

Lenny’ and Me 4 Today – Pacing My Days……

Standard

‘Lenny’ is my constant companion the doctors call COPD/Asthma.  Naming my constant health companion seems to make life easier for me in relating to my disease as it gives it a bit of a personality.  Besides treating ‘Lenny’ as a companion, come good days or bad, is much better than always dealing with it as an enemy.

This ‘Lenny and Me for Today’ is an occasional write about the adventures and handling of life together of ‘Lenny’ and me.

Let’s see where ‘Lenny’ and Me have been most recently – Pacing My Days…..

I have come to realize that the most difficult thing for me to deal with most days is pacing myself as I ride through the day, week, month or year.  I realize that dealing with ‘Lenny’ can and is at times, a most unpredictable companion and the only way to work at keeping ‘Lenny’ from causing a stir in my game plan is to pace my day and always watch for them triggers.

This past weekend my wonderful partner/caretaker, better known as my wife of nearly 25 years, joined me on a quick run out of state to visit our daughter and family that just recently moved.  It would be her first visit to their new home and community, plus it would just the two of us away from other family matters that we were trying our best not to disrupt our stress levels and everyday travels.

After having a wonderful time of catching up with my best friend from high school for lunch on Friday, we headed out for the five-hour trip – pacing ourselves so we would hit the big city of Kansas City just before weekend evening rush hour, and bingo, we did just that.

Of course, before leaving the old guy here remembered to toss her my oximeter and nitro, just in case I would need either one – yep, the old guy remembered to plan ahead and grab the medical protections.

Now I do not stay at my daughter’s, at least not yet, because they are still settling in and the house still is airing out from being empty for several months and full of moving boxes and stuff.  This meant we stayed at a wonderful hotel, which for me seems more convenient anyway with my c-pap and nebulizer machines.

We had a most great visit, had some quality food (including some of the best pizza ever) and spent a chunk of time before heading home taking in the sight and sounds of two beautiful lakes that both sit less than 10-15 minutes from my daughter’s home.

The theme of this posting of ‘Lenny and Me for Today’ is pacing, and that is what I did all weekend.  I paced myself when driving to make sure my stress level would stay low so not to offend ‘Lenny’.  I paced myself when walking around the two lakes, especially on the climb back up the steep incline from sandy beach and boat ramps.  I paced myself eating as eating itself can cause an occasional problem or two.  I paced myself playing with the grandkids, the grand-dog and time in the new home so not to set off any triggers.

Was the weekend perfect, darn near, while the important point was I paced myself while keeping the back of the mind and the outside edges of the eyes on a close watch for any possible triggers.

A message for this ‘Lenny and Me for Today’ would be – always work at pacing yourself in all aspects of your daily travels and that pacing should or must always include that watchful eye on triggers.

And that my friends, is where ‘Lenny’ (my COPD/Asthma) and me are at 4 today.

As always – if you or anyone you know have any symptoms involving lung and breathing functionality, and they linger over and over while disrupting a lifestyle – then please ask questions and get it checked out.

Remember – ‘a person without good breathing, is a person without a good life’, so let’s do what we can, to learn what we can, to improve what we can.

I bid to all – smiles, prayers, blessings and steady breathing – Mr. William.

(Copyright@2017, CrossDove Writer through wheezingaway.com – no part of this write may be used or copied without written permission.)

NOTES: Sometimes we share what may seem like medical information, but we are only giving descriptions and highlights of various aspects of having COPD and/or Asthma and no way do we ever want our information to be considered medical treatment type of information, always consult your physician for more, clearer medical founded information.